July 26, 2016
font size

Frostbite (cont.)

Medical Author:
Medical Editor:

What are the signs and symptoms of frostbite?

The signs and symptoms of frostbite depend on the extent and depth of tissue injury. Individuals with superficial frostbite may experience the following signs and symptoms to the affected area:

  • pain,
  • burning,
  • tingling,
  • numbness,
  • pale colored skin,
  • clear-colored skin blisters may develop, and
  • firm-feeling skin with soft underlying tissue which can move over bony ridges.

As the degree of injury progresses to involve deeper tissue structures, the signs and symptoms of deep frostbite can develop, which may include the following:

  • complete loss of sensation,
  • pale, yellowish, bluish, gray, or mottled skin color,
  • formation of blood-filled skin blisters, and
  • firm-feeling skin and underlying tissue, with the affected area feeling hard and solid.

With advanced frostbite injuries, the affected area can subsequently appear blackened and gangrene can develop, placing the affected individual at high-risk for infection.

Common Causes of Frequent Urination

  • Urinary tract infection: The lining of the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body) and bladder becomes inflamed and irritated due to byproducts of an infection (blood, white blood cells, bacteria). This irritation of the bladder wall causes the urge to empty the bladder frequently (called frequency).
  • Diabetes: An early symptom of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can be frequent urination, as the body tries to rid itself of unused glucose (blood sugar) through the urine. Diabetes can also damage the nerves that control the bladder, causing frequent urination and difficulty controlling your bladder
  • Diuretic use: Medications used to treat high blood pressure or fluid buildup work in the kidney and flush excess fluid from the body, causing frequent urination.
  • Prostate problems: An enlarged prostate can press against the urethra and block the flow of urine, causing the bladder wall to become irritated. The bladder contracts even when it contains small amounts of urine, causing more frequent urination.
  • Pregnancy: Hormonal changes and the growing uterus placing pressure on the bladder cause frequent urination, even in the early weeks of gestation. The trauma from vaginal childbirth can also cause damage to the urethra.
  • Interstitial cystitis: This condition is characterized by pain in the bladder and pelvic region, often leading to frequent urination.
  • Stroke or other neurological diseases: Damage to nerves that supply the bladder can lead to problems with bladder function, including frequent and sudden urges to urinate.
  • Bladder cancer: Tumors taking up space or causing bleeding in the bladder may lead to more frequent urination.
  • Overactive bladder syndrome: Often frequent urination is itself the problem. Involuntary bladder contractions lead to frequent and often urgent urination, even if the bladder is not full.
  • Drinking too much: Ingesting more fluids than your body needs can cause the body to urinate more often.
  • Artificial sweeteners, alcohol, caffeine and other foods: Alcohol and caffeine can act as diuretics, which can cause more frequent urination. Carbonated drinks, artificial sweeteners (such as Splenda or Equal), and citrus fruits are known to irritate the bladder, causing more frequent urination.

What are cold weather-related injuries without tissue freezing?

Cold weather-related injuries that do not involve tissue freezing include:

  • chilblains or pernio
  • frostnip, and
  • trench foot or immersion foot.

Chilblains

Chilblains (also known as pernio) are a common type of cold weather-related injury that can develop in predisposed individuals after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and humid conditions. Chilblains typically develop because of an abnormal vascular response several hours after the area exposed to cold is re-warmed. Chilblains are itchy, painful, reddish, or purplish areas of swelling that usually affect the fingers, toes, nose, or ears. In some individuals, blisters or small open sores may also form, increasing the risk for developing an infection. Chilblains usually last for several days, and the affected area usually heals after several weeks. Though the affected area may remain sensitive to the cold in the future, there is usually no permanent damage. It is not uncommon for chilblains to recur in susceptible individuals.

Frostnip

Frostnip is a mild cold weather-related injury that typically affects the face, ears, toes, and fingers.

Symptoms of frostnip usually occur after exposure to cold weather. The affected area(s) may:

  • appear pale,
  • be accompanied by burning, itching or pain;
  • tingle
  • feel numb

Simple rewarming restores normal color and sensation, and there is no subsequent permanent tissue damage.

Trench foot

Trench foot also referred to as immersion foot was named after the condition suffered by many soldiers in the trenches during World War I, though it is a condition still encountered today, often in homeless individuals. Trench foot develops after a prolonged exposure to a wet, cold, environment and is typically a more serious condition than chilblains. Tight-fitting, constricting boots and footwear serve to exacerbate the condition. Trench foot does not require freezing temperatures, and can occur with temperatures of up to 60 F (15.5 C).

The symptoms of trench foot may include:

  • pain,
  • itching,
  • numbness, and
  • swelling.

The affected foot may appear red or blotchy (red and pale areas mixed together) or even bluish-black with advanced injury.

As with chilblains, blisters and open sores can develop. With severe trench foot, the tissue dies and sloughs off, and the development of gangrene can occur, sometimes requiring amputation. The usual recovery period for uncomplicated trench foot can be several weeks.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/23/2016

Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/frostbite/article.htm

Women's Health

Find out what women really need.

advertisement
advertisement
Use Pill Finder Find it Now See Interactions

Pill Identifier on RxList

  • quick, easy,
    pill identification

Find a Local Pharmacy

  • including 24 hour, pharmacies

Interaction Checker

  • Check potential drug interactions
Search the Medical Dictionary for Health Definitions & Medical Abbreviations