July 23, 2016

Ginseng, Siberian

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How does Ginseng, Siberian work?

Siberian ginseng contains many chemicals that affect the brain, immune system, and certain hormones. It might also contain chemicals that have activity against some bacteria and viruses.

Are there safety concerns?

Siberian ginseng is LIKELY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth, short-term. While side effects are rare, some people can have drowsiness, changes in heart rhythm, sadness, anxiety, muscle spasms, and other side effects. In high doses, increased blood pressure might occur.

Siberian ginseng is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth, long-term, or when injected intravenously (by IV), short term. Siberian ginseng has been taken by mouth in combination with rehmannia, calcium, and vitamin D for up to one year. Siberian ginseng has been injected by IV for up to 2 weeks.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Children: Siberian ginseng is POSSIBLY SAFE in teenagers (ages 12-17 years) when taken by mouth for up to 6 weeks. There is not enough reliable information about the safety of Siberian ginseng when taken by teenagers long-term.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking Siberian ginseng if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorders: Siberian ginseng contains chemicals that might slow blood clotting. In theory, Siberian ginseng might increase the risk of bleeding and bruising in people with bleeding disorders.

Heart conditions: Siberian ginseng can cause a pounding heart, irregular heartbeat, and high blood pressure. People who have heart disorders (e.g., "hardening of the arteries," rheumatic heart disease, or history of heart attack) should use Siberian ginseng only under a healthcare provider's supervision.

Diabetes: Siberian ginseng might increase or decrease blood sugar. In theory, Siberian ginseng might affect blood sugar control in people with diabetes. Monitor your blood sugar carefully if you take Siberian ginseng and have diabetes.

Hormone-sensitive conditions such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Siberian ginseng might act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don't use Siberian ginseng.

High blood pressure: Siberian ginseng should not be used by people with blood pressure over 180/90. Siberian ginseng might make high blood pressure worse.

Mental conditions such as mania or schizophrenia: Siberian ginseng might make these conditions worse. Use with caution.


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