Recommended Topic Related To:

GlucaGen

"Though diabetes prevalence among both men and women rose between 1976 and 2010, NIH researchers and collaborators have found that the reasons for those increases may have been somewhat different in each gender. The scientists found that the aging"...

GlucaGen

GlucaGen Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: GlucaGen, Glucagon Emergency Kit for Low Blood Sugar

Generic Name: glucagon (Pronunciation: GLOO ka gon)

What is glucagon (GlucaGen)?

Glucagon is a hormone that increases blood sugar levels. It also slows involuntary muscle movements of the stomach and intestines that aid in digestion.

Glucagon is used to treat hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Glucagon is also used during a radiologic (x-ray) examination to help diagnose certain disorders of the stomach or intestines.

Glucagon may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of glucagon (GlucaGen)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; fast or slow heartbeat; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects may include nausea or vomiting.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the GlucaGen (glucagon [rdna origin]) for injection) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

What is the most important information I should know about glucagon (GlucaGen)?

Glucagon should be used to treat hypoglycemia only if the person cannot eat, passes out, or is having a seizure. Be sure you know how to give a glucagon injection before you need to use it.

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can happen to everyone who has diabetes. Symptoms include headache, hunger, sweating, pale skin, irritability, dizziness, feeling shaky, or trouble concentrating. Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Other sugar sources include fruit juice, crackers, raisins, and non-diet soda. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to glucagon or lactose, or if you have a tumor of the pancreas (insulinoma) or adrenal gland (pheochromocytoma).

Before using glucagon, tell your doctor if you have any tumor of the pancreas, if you have not recently eaten on a regular basis, or if you have chronic low blood sugar.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially indomethacin (Indocin), insulin, a blood thinner (such as Coumadin), or a beta blocker (such as Betapace, Coreg, Corgard, Dutoprol, Inderal, InnoPran, Lopressor, Normodyne, Tenormin, Tenoretic, Toprol, Trandate, and others).

Hypoglycemia should be treated as quickly as possible. Having low blood sugar for too long can cause seizure, coma, or death. Call your doctor after each time you use a glucagon injection.

If you are a caregiver, get emergency medical help after giving a glucagon injection. If the patient does not wake up within 15 minutes, you may need to mix a new dose and give a second injection.

Side Effects Centers
A A A

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Diabetes

Find tips and advances in treatment.


NIH talks about Ebola on WebMD