November 27, 2015
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Guanfacine Hydrochloride

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Guanfacine Hydrochloride



Signs and Symptoms: Drowsiness, lethargy, bradycardia, and hypotension have been observed following overdose with guanfacine.

A 25-year-old female intentionally ingested 60 mg. She presented with severe drowsiness and bradycardia of 45 beats/minute. Gastric lavage was performed and an infusion of isoproterenol (0.8 mg in 12 hours) was administered. She recovered quickly and without sequelae.

A 28-year-old female who ingested 30-40 mg developed only lethargy, was treated with activated charcoal and a cathartic, was monitored for 24 hours, and was discharged in good health.

A 2-year-old male weighing 12 kg, who ingested up to 4 mg of guanfacine, developed lethargy. Gastric lavage (followed by activated charcoal and sorbitol slurry via NG tube) removed some tablet fragments within 2 hours after ingestion, and vital signs were normal.

During 24-hours observation in ICU, systolic pressure was 58 and heart rate 70 at 16 hours postingestion. No intervention was required, and child was discharged fully recovered the next day.

Treatment of Overdosage: Gastric lavage and supportive therapy as appropriate. Guanfacine is not dialyzable in clinically significant amounts (2.4%).


Guanfacine hydrochloride (guanfacine) tablets are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to the drug.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Last reviewed on RxList: 12/6/2007


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