HepaGam B

SIDE EFFECTS

Overall Adverse Reaction Profile

The most common expected adverse drug reactions for intravenous immune globulins like HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) are chills, fever, headaches, vomiting, allergic reactions, nausea, arthralgia and moderate low back pain.7-8 In a clinical trial in liver transplant patients, 2 adverse drug reactions of tremor and hypotension were reported in 2 of 14 patients who received intravenous infusions of HepaGam B.8 In studies with healthy volunteers, only 1 adverse drug reaction of nausea was reported in the 70 adult subjects who received an intramuscular administration of HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) .8

Although no anaphylactic reactions have been reported following HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) administration, anaphylactic reactions have been reported following the administration of other immune globulin products on rare occasions [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Adverse Reactions in Clinical Trials

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Hepatitis B-Related Liver Transplantation

In an ongoing clinical trial, only 2 adverse drug reactions occurred following the 313 (<1%) HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) infusions in 14 liver transplant patients. A listing of all adverse events (including those assessed as unrelated to study drug) occurring in >10% of patients are summarized in Table 4 below. These adverse events were reported in an interim analysis from a one-year Phase 3 clinical trial examining HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) for the prevention of hepatitis B recurrence following liver transplantation. This study utilized the recommended dosing regimen outlined in Table 1 [See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. The 2 attributed adverse drug reactions of tremor and hypotension were reported in 2 patients. All reactions were associated with a single HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) infusion during the first week post-transplant. All reactions resolved on the same day and did not recur with subsequent HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) infusions.

Table 4 - Adverse Events (AEs) Occurring in >10% of Liver Transplant Patients

Adverse Event by system organ class Number of AEs
(in number of patients) N=14
Blood and lymphatic systems disorder
- Splenomegaly 8(6)
Eye disorders
- Presbyopia 2(2)
Gastrointestinal disorders
-Aphthous stomatitis 3(3)
- Diarrhoea 10(8)
- Dyspepsia 5(5)
- Gingival Hyperplasia 3(3)
General disorders
- Fatigue 6(6)
- Oedema peripheral 3(2)
- Pyrexia 3(3)
Hepatobiliary disorders
- Hepatobiliary disease 3(3)
Immune system disorders
- Liver transplant rejection 7(5)
Infections and infestations
- Diarrhea Infectious 2(2)
- Pneumonia 2(2)
- Sepsis 3(2)
Metabolism and nutrition disorders
- Hyperglycaemia 4(4)
Musculoskeletal
- Back pain 2(2)
Nervous system disorders
- Amnesia 2(2)
- Essential Tremor 6(2)
- Headache 15(9)
Psychiatric disorders
- Agitation 2(2)
Renal and urinary disorders
- Nocturia 2(2)
Respiratory thoracic and mediastinal
- Pleural effusion 3(3)
Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders
- Pruritus 3(3)
- Rash 2(2)
Vascular disorders
- Hypertension 8(7)
- Hypotension 2(2)

Healthy Volunteer Studies

Seventy healthy male and female volunteers received a single dose of HepaGam B™ (Hepatitis B Immune Globulin Intravenous [Human]) intramuscularly in clinical trials.8 Seventeen (17) subjects reported 30 adverse events following administration of HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) . The most frequently reported adverse events included 4 subjects (6%) who experienced headache. 7 subjects (10%) who had cold symptoms or flu and 2 subjects (3%) who experienced lightheadeness/ fainted. The majority of events were reported as mild and were not related to study drug. One adverse event, an episode of nausea, was considered to be drug related. There were no serious adverse events reported. A similar number of subjects in the comparator groups reported adverse events.

Postmarketing Experience

As of April 2007, there have been no postmarketing adverse events reported for HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) administered i.m.

Read the HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Live Attenuated Virus Vaccines

Immune globulin administration may impair the efficacy of live attenuated virus vaccines such as measles, rubella, mumps and varicella.1,2,7 Vaccination with live virus vaccines should be deferred until approximately three months after administration of HepaGam B, Hepatitis B Immune Globulin Intravenous (Human). Persons who received HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) less than 14 days after live virus vaccination should be revaccinated 3 months after the administration of the immune globulin, unless serologic test results indicate that antibodies were produced.1-2

There are no available data on drug interactions of HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) with other medications.

Drug-Laboratory Interactions: Serological Testing

Antibodies present in HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) may interfere with some serological tests. After administration of immune globulins like HepaGam B (hepatitis b immune globulin (human)) , a transitory increase of passively transferred antibodies in the patient's blood may result in misleading positive results in serological testing (e.g. Coombs' test).

Drug-Laboratory Interactions: Blood Glucose Testing

HepaGam B™ (Hepatitis B Immune Globulin Intravenous [Human]) contains maltose which can interfere with certain types of blood glucose monitoring systems, [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] Only testing systems that are glucose-specific should be used in patients receiving HepaGam B. This interference can result in falsely elevated glucose readings that can lead to untreated hypoglycemia or to inappropriate insulin administration, resulting in life-threatening hypoglycemia.

The product information of the blood glucose testing system, including that of the test strips, should be carefully reviewed to determine if the system is appropriate for use with maltose-containing parenteral products. If any uncertainty exists, contact the manufacturer of the testing system to determine if the system is appropriate for use with maltose-containing parenteral products.

REFERENCES

1. CDC. A comprehensive immunization strategy to eliminate transmission of hepatitis B virus infection in the United States. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). Part 1: Immunization of infants, children, and adolescents. MMWR2005; 54(RR-16): 1-32.

2. CDC. A comprehensive immunization strategy to eliminate transmission of hepatitis B virus infection in the United States. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). Part 2: Immunization of adults. MMWR 2006; 55(RR-16): 1-33.

7. Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP). Core SPC for human plasma derived hepatitis-B immunoglobulin for intravenous use (CPMP/BPWG/4027/02). London, UK: The European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products. 2003.

8. Unpublished data on file.

Last reviewed on RxList: 2/20/2009
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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