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Hepatitis A (cont.)

What are the symptoms of hepatitis A?

Most people do not have any symptoms of hepatitis A. If symptoms of hepatitis A occur, they include

  • feeling tired
  • muscle soreness
  • upset stomach
  • fever
  • loss of appetite
  • stomach pain
  • diarrhea
  • dark-yellow urine
  • light-colored stools
  • yellowish eyes and skin, called jaundice

Symptoms of hepatitis A can occur 2 to 7 weeks after coming into contact with the virus. Children younger than age 6 may have no symptoms. Older children and adults often get mild, flulike symptoms. See a doctor right away if you or a child in your care has symptoms of hepatitis A.

How is hepatitis A diagnosed?

A blood test will show if you have hepatitis A. Blood tests are done at a doctor's office or outpatient facility. A blood sample is taken using a needle inserted into a vein in your arm or hand. The blood sample is sent to a lab to test for hepatitis A.

How is hepatitis A treated?

Hepatitis A usually gets better in a few weeks without treatment. However, some people can have symptoms for up to 6 months. Your doctor may suggest medicines to help relieve your symptoms. Talk with your doctor before taking prescription and over-the-counter medicines.

See your doctor regularly to make sure your body has fully recovered. If symptoms persist after 6 months, then you should see your doctor again.

When you recover, your body will have learned to fight off a future hepatitis A infection. However, you can still get other kinds of hepatitis.

How can I avoid getting hepatitis A?

You can avoid getting hepatitis A by receiving the hepatitis A vaccine.

Vaccines are medicines that keep you from getting sick. Vaccines teach the body to attack specific viruses and infections. The hepatitis A vaccine teaches your body to attack the hepatitis A virus.

The hepatitis A vaccine is given in two shots. The second shot is given 6 to 12 months after the first shot. You should get both hepatitis A vaccine shots to be fully protected.

All children should be vaccinated between 12 and 23 months of age. Discuss the hepatitis A vaccine with your child's doctor.

Adults at higher risk of getting hepatitis A and people with chronic liver disease should also be vaccinated.

If you are traveling to countries where hepatitis A is common, including Mexico, try to get both shots before you go. If you don't have time to get both shots before you travel, get the first shot as soon as possible. Most people gain some protection within 2 weeks after the first shot.

You can also protect yourself and others from hepatitis A if you

  • always wash your hands with warm, soapy water after using the toilet or changing diapers and before fixing food or eating
  • use bottled water for drinking, making ice cubes, and washing fruits and vegetables when you are in a developing country
  • tell your doctor and your dentist if you have hepatitis A

Patient Comments

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Hepatitis A - Causes Question: If known, how did you contract hepatitis A? Please discuss possible causes.
Hepatitis A - Symptoms Question: What were your symptoms associated with hepatitis A?
Hepatitis A - Treatment Question: If you were diagnosed with hepatitis A, how was it treated?
Hepatitis A - Vaccine Question: Has your child been vaccinated for hepatitis A? Please share your experience.
Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/hepatitis_a/article.htm

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