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Iclusig

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Iclusig

Warnings
Precautions

WARNINGS

Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section.

PRECAUTIONS

Vascular Occlusion

Arterial and venous thrombosis and occlusions, including fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, stenosis of large arterial vessels of the brain, severe peripheral vascular disease, and the need for urgent revascularization procedures have occurred in at least 27% of Iclusig-treated patients from the phase 1 and phase 2 trials. Iclusig can cause fatal and life-threatening vascular occlusion within 2 weeks of starting treatment. Iclusig can also cause recurrent or multi-site vascular occlusion.

In the dose-escalation (phase 1) clinical trial, 48% (31/65) of patients with CML or Ph+ ALL developed vascular occlusive events. The median time to onset of the first vascular occlusion event was 5 months. Iclusig can cause fatal and life-threatening vascular occlusion in patients treated at dose levels as low as 15 mg per day.

Patients with and without cardiovascular risk factors, including patients age 50 years or younger, experienced these events. Vascular occlusion adverse events were more frequent with increasing age and in patients with prior history of ischemia, hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia (see Table 4).

Table 4: Vascular Occlusion Incidence in Iclusig-Treated Patients in Phase 2 Trial According to Risk Categories

  Prior history of ischemia, hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia No history of ischemia, hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia
Age: 49 or younger 18% (6/33) 12% (13/112)
Age: 50 to 74 years 33% (50/152) 18% (20/114)
Age: 75 and older 56% (14/25) 46% (6/13)
All age groups 33% (70/210) 16% (39/239)
Total 24% (109/449)

Arterial Occlusion and Thrombosis

Arterial occlusion and thrombosis occurred in at least 20% (91/449) of Iclusig-treated patients with some patients experiencing events of more than one type. Patients have required revascularization procedures (cerebrovascular, coronary, and peripheral arterial) due to vascular occlusion from Iclusig.

Cardiac vascular occlusion, including fatal and life-threatening myocardial infarction and coronary artery occlusion has occurred in 12% (55/449) of Iclusig-treated patients. Patients have developed heart failure concurrent or subsequent to the myocardial ischemic event.

Cerebrovascular occlusion, including fatal stroke, has occurred in 6% (27/449) of Iclusig-treated patients. Iclusig can cause stenosis over multiple segments in major arterial vessels that supply the brain (e.g., carotid, vertebral, middle cerebral artery).

Peripheral arterial occlusive events, including fatal mesenteric artery occlusion and life-threatening peripheral arterial disease, have occurred in 8% (36/449) of Iclusig-treated patients. Patients have developed digital or distal extremity necrosis and have required amputations.

Clinicians should consider whether the benefits of Iclusig treatment are expected to exceed the risks of therapy. In patients suspected of developing arterial thrombotic events, interrupt or stop Iclusig. A benefit-risk consideration should guide a decision to restart Iclusig therapy. [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Venous Thromboembolism

Venous thromboembolic events occurred in 5% (23/449) of Iclusig-treated patients, including deep venous thrombosis (8 patients), pulmonary embolism (6 patients), superficial thrombophlebitis (3 patients), and retinal vein thrombosis (2 patients). Consider dose modification or discontinuation of Iclusig in patients who develop serious venous thromboembolism [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Heart Failure

Fatal and serious heart failure or left ventricular dysfunction occurred in 5% of Iclusig-treated patients (N =22). Eight percent of patients (N= 35) experienced any grade of heart failure or left ventricular dysfunction. Monitor patients for signs or symptoms consistent with heart failure and treat as clinically indicated, including interruption of Iclusig. Consider discontinuation of Iclusig in patients who develop serious heart failure [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Hepatotoxicity

Iclusig can cause hepatotoxicity, including liver failure and death. Fulminant hepatic failure leading to death occurred in an Iclusig-treated patient within one week of starting Iclusig. Two additional fatal cases of acute liver failure also occurred. The fatal cases occurred in patients with blast phase (BP) CML or Ph+ ALL. Severe hepatotoxicity occurred in all disease cohorts.

The incidence of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) or alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation was 56% (all grades) and 8% (grade 3 or 4). Iclusig treatment may result in elevation in ALT, AST, or both. ALT or AST elevation was not reversed by the date of last follow-up in 5% of patients.

Monitor liver function tests at baseline, then at least monthly or as clinically indicated. Interrupt, reduce or discontinue Iclusig as clinically indicated [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Hypertension

Treatment-emergent hypertension occurred in 67% of patients (300/449). Eight patients (2%) treated with Iclusig in clinical trials experienced treatment-emergent symptomatic hypertension as a serious adverse reaction, including hypertensive crisis. Patients may require urgent clinical intervention for hypertension associated with confusion, headache, chest pain, or shortness of breath [see ADVERSE REACTIONS]. In patients with baseline systolic BP < 140 mm Hg and baseline diastolic BP < 90mm Hg, 78% (220/282) experienced treatment-emergent hypertension; 49% (139/282) developed Stage 1 hypertension (defined as systolic BP ≥ 140 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mm Hg) while 29% developed Stage 2 hypertension (defined as systolic BP ≥ 160 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥ 100 mm Hg). In 131 patients with Stage 1 hypertension at baseline, 61% (80/131) developed Stage 2 hypertension. Monitor and manage blood pressure elevations during Iclusig use and treat hypertension to normalize blood pressure. Interrupt, dose reduce, or stop Iclusig if hypertension is not medically controlled.

Pancreatitis

Clinical pancreatitis occurred in 6% (28/449) of patients (5% grade 3) treated with Iclusig. Pancreatitis resulted in discontinuation or treatment interruption in 6% of patients (25/449). Twenty-two of the 28 cases of pancreatitis resolved within 2 weeks with dose interruption or reduction. The incidence of treatment-emergent lipase elevation was 41%.

Check serum lipase every 2 weeks for the first 2 months and then monthly thereafter or as clinically indicated. Consider additional serum lipase monitoring in patients with a history of pancreatitis or alcohol abuse. Dose interruption or reduction may be required. In cases where lipase elevations are accompanied by abdominal symptoms, interrupt treatment with Iclusig and evaluate patients for pancreatitis [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. Do not consider restarting Iclusig until patients have complete resolution of symptoms and lipase levels are less than 1.5 x ULN.

Neuropathy

Peripheral and cranial neuropathy have occurred in Iclusig-treated patients. Overall, 13% (59/449) of Iclusig-treated patients experienced a peripheral neuropathy event of any grade (2%, grade 3/4). In clinical trials, the most common peripheral neuropathies reported were peripheral neuropathy (4%, 18/449), paresthesia (4%, 17/449), hypoesthesia (2%, 11/449), and hyperesthesia (1%, 5/449). Cranial neuropathy developed in 1% (6/449) of Iclusig-treated patients ( < 1% grade 3/4).

Of the patients who developed neuropathy, 31% (20/65) developed neuropathy during the first month of treatment. Monitor patients for symptoms of neuropathy, such as hypoesthesia, hyperesthesia, paresthesia, discomfort, a burning sensation, neuropathic pain or weakness. Consider interrupting Iclusig and evaluate if neuropathy is suspected.

Ocular Toxicity

Serious ocular toxicities leading to blindness or blurred vision have occurred in Iclusig-treated patients. Retinal toxicities including macular edema, retinal vein occlusion, and retinal hemorrhage occurred in 3% of Iclusig-treated patients. Conjunctival or corneal irritation, dry eye, or eye pain occurred in 13% of patients. Visual blurring occurred in 6% of patients. Other ocular toxicities include cataracts, glaucoma, iritis, iridocyclitis, and ulcerative keratitis. Conduct comprehensive eye exams at baseline and periodically during treatment [see ADVERSE REACTIONS].

Hemorrhage

Serious bleeding events, including fatalities, occurred in 5% (22/449) of patients treated with Iclusig. Hemorrhage occurred in 24% of patients. The incidence of serious bleeding events was higher in patients with AP-CML, BP-CML, and Ph+ ALL. Cerebral hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage were the most commonly reported serious bleeding events. Most hemorrhagic events, but not all, occurred in patients with grade 4 thrombocytopenia. Interrupt Iclusig for serious or severe hemorrhage and evaluate [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Fluid Retention

Fluid retention events judged as serious occurred in 3% (13/449) of patients treated with Iclusig. One instance of brain edema was fatal. Serious fluid retention events in more than 1 patient included: pericardial effusion (6/449, 1%), pleural effusion (5/449, 1%), and ascites (2/449, < 1%).

In total, fluid retention occurred in 23% of the patients. The most common fluid retention events were peripheral edema (16%), pleural effusion (7%), and pericardial effusion (3%).

Monitor patients for fluid retention and manage patients as clinically indicated. Interrupt, reduce, or discontinue Iclusig as clinically indicated [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Cardiac Arrhythmias

Symptomatic bradyarrhythmias that led to a requirement for pacemaker implantation occurred in 1% (3/449) of Iclusigtreated patients. The cardiac rhythms (1 case each) identified were complete heart block, sick sinus syndrome, and atrial fibrillation with bradycardia and pauses. Advise patients to report signs and symptoms suggestive of slow heart rate (fainting, dizziness, or chest pain). Interrupt Iclusig and evaluate.

Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias occurred in 5% (25/449) of Iclusig-treated patients. Atrial fibrillation was the most common supraventricular tachyarrhythmia and occurred in 20 patients. The other supraventricular tachyarrhythmias were atrial flutter (4 patients), supraventricular tachycardia (4 patients), and atrial tachycardia (1 patient). For 13 patients, the event led to hospitalization. Advise patients to report signs and symptoms of rapid heart rate (palpitations, dizziness). Interrupt Iclusig and evaluate.

Myelosuppression

Severe (grade 3 or 4) myelosuppression occurred in 48% (215/449) of patients treated with Iclusig. The incidence of these events was greater in patients with AP-CML, BP-CML, and Ph+ ALL than in patients with CP-CML. Obtain complete blood counts every 2 weeks for the first 3 months and then monthly or as clinically indicated, and adjust the dose as recommended [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Tumor Lysis Syndrome

Two patients ( < 1%) treated with Iclusig developed serious tumor lysis syndrome. Both cases occurred in patients with advanced CML. Hyperuricemia occurred in 7% (30/449) of patients; the majority had CP-CML (19 patients). Due to the potential for tumor lysis syndrome in patients with advanced disease (AP-CML, BP-CML, or Ph+ ALL), ensure adequate hydration and treat high uric acid levels prior to initiating therapy with Iclusig.

Compromised Wound Healing And Gastrointestinal Perforation

No formal studies of the effect of Iclusig on wound healing have been conducted. Based on the mechanism of action [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY], Iclusig could compromise wound healing. Serious gastrointestinal perforation (fistula) occurred in one patient 38 days post-cholecystectomy.

Interrupt Iclusig for at least 1 week prior to major surgery. The decision when to resume Iclusig after surgery should be based on clinical judgment of adequate wound healing.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Iclusig can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman based on its mechanism of action and findings in animals. Ponatinib caused embryo-fetal toxicity in rats at exposures lower than human exposures at the recommended human dose. If this drug is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus. Advise women to avoid pregnancy while taking Iclusig [see Use In Specific Populations].

Patient Counseling Information

See FDA-Approved Patient Labeling (Medication Guide).

Advise patients of the following and provide a copy of the Medication Guide:

Vascular Occlusions

Inform patients that serious arterial thromboses (including arterial stenosis sometimes requiring revascularization) and venous thromboembolism events have occurred. Advise patients to immediately contact their health care provider with any symptoms suggestive of a blood clot such as chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness on one side of the body, speech problems, leg pain, or leg swelling [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Heart Failure and Cardiac Arrhythmias

Inform patients of the possibility of heart failure, and abnormally slow or fast heart rates. Advise patients to contact their health care provider if they experience symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, palpitations, dizziness, or fainting [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Hepatotoxicity

Inform patients of the possibility of developing liver function abnormalities and serious hepatic toxicity. Advise patients to immediately contact their health care provider if signs of liver failure occur, including jaundice, anorexia, bleeding or bruising [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Hypertension

Inform patients of the possibility of new or worsening of existing hypertension. Advise patients to contact their health care provider for elevated blood pressure or if symptoms of hypertension occur including headache, dizziness, chest pain, or shortness of breath [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Pancreatitis

Inform patients of the possibility of developing pancreatitis that may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, or abdominal discomfort, and to promptly report these symptoms [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Neuropathy

Inform patients of the possibility of developing peripheral or cranial neuropathy while being treated with Iclusig. Advise patients to report symptoms of neuropathy, such as hypoesthesia, hyperesthesia, paresthesia, discomfort, a burning sensation, neuropathic pain, or weakness [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Ocular Toxicity

Inform patients of the possibility of ocular toxicity while being treated with Iclusig. Advise patients to report symptoms of ocular toxicity, such as blurred vision, dry eye, or eye pain [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Hemorrhage

Inform patients of the possibility of serious bleeding and to immediately contact their health care provider with any signs or symptoms suggestive of hemorrhage such as unusual bleeding or easy bruising [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Fluid Retention

Inform patients of the possibility of developing fluid retention and to contact their health care provider for symptoms such as leg swelling, abdominal swelling, weight gain, or shortness of breath [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Myelosuppression

Inform patients of the possibility of developing low blood cell counts; inform patients to report immediately should fever develop, particularly in association with any suggestion of infection [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Compromised Wound Healing and Gastrointestinal Perforation

Advise patients to inform their health care provider if they plan to undergo a surgical procedure or had recent surgery [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. Inform patients that cases of gastrointestinal perforation have been reported [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Inform patients that Iclusig can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise women of the potential hazard to a fetus and to avoid becoming pregnant [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS and Use in Specific Populations].

Instructions for Taking Iclusig

Advise patients to take Iclusig exactly as prescribed and not to change their dose or to stop taking Iclusig unless they are told to do so by their health care provider. Iclusig may be taken with or without food. Iclusig tablets should be swallowed whole. Patients should not crush or dissolve the tablets.

Patients should not take two doses at the same time to make up for a missed dose.

Lactose

Inform patients that Iclusig contains 121 mg of lactose monohydrate in a 45 mg daily dose.

Nonclinical Toxicology

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment Of Fertility

Carcinogenicity studies have not been performed with ponatinib.

Ponatinib was not mutagenic in a bacterial mutagenesis (Ames) assay, was not clastogenic in a chromosome aberration assay in human lymphocytes, nor was it clastogenic in an in vivo mouse micronucleus assay at oral doses up to 2000 mg/kg.

Ponatinib may impair male and female fertility. Fertility studies using ponatinib were not conducted. However, ponatinib effects on male and female reproductive organs observed during general toxicology studies included degeneration of epithelium of the testes in rats and monkeys and follicular atresia in the monkey ovary with associated endometrial atrophy. Effects seen in rats were at exposures approximating the AUC in patients receiving the recommended dose of 45 mg/day and in monkeys were approximately 4 times the AUC in patients.

Use In Specific Populations

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category D

Risk Summary

Based on its mechanism of action and findings in animals, Iclusig can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies with Iclusig in pregnant women. Advise women to avoid becoming pregnant while taking Iclusig. If this drug is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to a fetus.

Animal Data

Ponatinib was studied for effects on embryo-fetal development in pregnant rats given oral doses of 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg/day during organogenesis. At the maternally toxic dose of 3 mg/kg/day (equivalent to the AUC in patients receiving the recommended dose of 45 mg/day), ponatinib caused embryo-fetal toxicity as shown by increased resorptions, reduced body weight, external alterations, multiple soft tissue and skeletal alterations, and reduced ossification. Embryo-fetal toxicities also were observed at 1 mg/kg/day (approximately 24% the AUC in patients receiving the recommended dose) and involved multiple fetal soft tissue and skeletal alterations, including reduced ossification.

Nursing Mothers

It is unknown whether ponatinib is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from ponatinib, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue Iclusig, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Pediatric Use

The safety and efficacy of Iclusig in patients less than 18 years of age have not been established.

Geriatric Use

One hundred and fifty-five of 449 patients (35%) in the clinical trial of Iclusig were 65 years of age and over. In patients with CP-CML, patients of age ≥ 65 years had a lower major cytogenetic response rate (38%) as compared with patients < 65 years of age (64%). In patients with AP-CML, BP-CML, and Ph+ ALL, patients of age ≥ 65 years had a higher major hematologic response rate (47%) as compared with patients < 65 years of age (40%). Forty-six percent of patients ≥ 65 years had vascular occlusion events. Patients of age ≥ 65 years are more likely to experience adverse reactions including vascular occlusion, decreased platelet count, peripheral edema, increased lipase, dyspnea, asthenia, muscle spasms, and decreased appetite. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

Hepatic Impairment

Administer Iclusig at a dose of 30 mg once daily in patients with hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh A, B, or C). [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION and CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY].

In a single-dose (30 mg) pharmacokinetic (PK) study; compared to subjects with normal liver function, no major differences in ponatinib PK were observed in subjects with hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh A, B, or C). However, there was an increased overall incidence of adverse reactions (e.g., gastrointestinal disorders, including a case of severe pancreatitis) in the subjects with hepatic impairment following the single 30 mg dose compared to subjects with normal liver function. The safety of multiple ponatinib doses, or doses higher than 30 mg have not been studied in patients with hepatic impairment.

Renal Impairment

Iclusig has not been studied in patients with renal impairment. Although renal excretion is not a major route of ponatinib elimination, the potential for moderate or severe renal impairment to affect hepatic elimination has not been determined [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY].

Last reviewed on RxList: 8/7/2014
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Warnings
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