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IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

IRON DEXTRAN - INJECTION

(EYE-urn DEX-tran)

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Dexferrum, Imferon, INFeD

WARNING: Infrequently, iron dextran for injection has caused severe (sometimes fatal) allergic reactions. It should be used only when clearly needed and when a patient is unable to take iron by mouth (oral forms).

Tell your doctor immediately if you experience signs of an allergic reaction such as trouble breathing, dizziness, rash, or itchy skin.

USES: This medication is used to treat "iron-poor" blood (anemia) in people who cannot take iron by mouth because of side effects or because their anemia has not been successfully treated by it. Low iron levels can occur when the body can't get enough iron from food (poor nutrition, poor absorption) or when there is a large or long-term blood loss (e.g., hemophilia, stomach bleeding). You may also need extra iron because of blood loss during kidney dialysis. Your body may need more iron if you use the drug erythropoietin to help make new red blood cells.

Iron is an important part of your red blood cells and is needed to carry oxygen in the body.

HOW TO USE: This medication is usually injected deep into the muscle of the buttock or slowly into a vein as directed by your doctor. When injecting into the buttock, the next injection is given on the opposite side from the last injection.

Before the first full dose, a smaller test dose is given slowly to check for possible allergic effects. If no reaction is seen after one hour, the full dose may be given. You will be checked carefully for reactions by a health care worker each time you are getting the iron.

Iron injections may be given once daily in small doses or as directed by your doctor. Large doses may be given in a solution and injected into a vein over several hours. Some side effects such as dizziness and flushing may be stopped by giving the drug more slowly. The dose and length of treatment is based on your age, weight, condition, and response to therapy. Your doctor will order blood tests to monitor your response.

If you are giving this medication to yourself at home, learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the liquid. Learn how to store and discard medical supplies safely.

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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