July 29, 2016

Inositol Nicotinate

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How does Inositol Nicotinate work?

Inositol nicotinate releases a form of niacin when it is processed by the body. The niacin can widen blood vessels, lower blood levels of fats such as cholesterol, and break up a protein needed for the clotting of blood.

Are there safety concerns?

Inositol nicotinate is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth. It can cause some side effects such as stomach upset, headache, nausea, burping, and hiccups. It might also cause liver damage like other niacin products in some people.

Some inositol nicotinate products are promoted as "no-flush" niacin because some people think they don't cause as much flushing as regular niacin. But this possible benefit has not been proven in research studies.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking inositol nicotinate if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Allergies: Niacin, a chemical that is released when inositol nicotinate breaks down in the body, might make allergies worse by releasing histamine. This is the chemical that triggers allergy symptoms.

Bleeding disorder: Inositol nicotinate might slow blood clotting. In theory, inositol nicotinate might increase the risk of bleeding and make bleeding disorders worse.

Heart disease/heart-related chest pain (unstable angina): Large amounts of niacin, a chemical that is released when inositol nicotinate breaks down in the body, can increase the risk of irregular heartbeat. If you have a heart condition, check with your healthcare provider before using inositol nicotinate.

Diabetes: Niacin, a chemical that is released when inositol nicotinate breaks down in the body, can interfere with blood sugar control. This might require an adjustment in the dose of medicines needed to control diabetes. Increased blood sugar monitoring may be necessary, particularly at the beginning of treatment. If you have diabetes, check with your healthcare provider before using inositol nicotinate.

Gallbladder disease: Niacin, a chemical that is released when inositol nicotinate breaks down in the body, might make gallbladder problems worse. Use with caution.

Gout: Large amounts of niacin, a chemical that is released when inositol nicotinate breaks down in the body, might trigger gout. Use with caution.

Low blood pressure: Niacin, a chemical that is released when inositol nicotinate breaks down in the body, can cause low blood pressure. Use with caution.

Kidney disease: Niacin, a chemical that is released when inositol nicotinate breaks down in the body, might accumulate in people with kidney disease and make their condition worse. Don't use inositol nicotinate if you have kidney problems.

Liver disease: Niacin, a chemical that is released when inositol nicotinate breaks down in the body, can cause liver damage. Don't use inositol nicotinate if you have liver disease.

Sensitivity to niacin: Niacin is released when inositol nicotinate is processed by the body. If you are sensitive to niacin, don't use inositol nicotinate.

Ulcers in the stomach or intestines (peptic ulcer disease): Large amounts of niacin, a chemical that is released when inositol nicotinate breaks down in the body, might make peptic ulcer disease worse. Don't use inositol nicotinate if you have ulcers.

Surgery: Inositol nicotinate might slow blood clotting. There is some concern that it might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking inositol nicotinate at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.


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