May 28, 2016

Jambolan

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What other names is Jambolan known by?

Badijamun, Black Plum, Duhat, Eugenia cumini, Eugenia jambolana, Indian Blackberry, Jaman, Jambol Tree, Jambolan, Jambolan Plum, Jambolao, Jambose, Jambosier, Jambu, Jambul, Jamelongue, Jamelonguier, Jamum, Java Plum, Jumbul, Kavika Ni India, Mahajambu, Mesegerak, Phadena, Plum, Prune de Java, Rajajambu, Rose Apple, Syxygii Cumini Cortex, Syzygium cumini, Syzygium jambolanum, Syzygium jambos.

What is Jambolan?

Jambolan is a tree. The seed, leaf, bark, and fruit are used to make medicine.

Jambolan is widely used in folk medicine for diabetes.

It is also used for digestion disorders including gas (flatulence), bowel spasms, stomach problems, and severe diarrhea (dysentery).

Another use is treatment of lung problems such as bronchitis and asthma.

Some people use jambolan as an aphrodisiac to increase interest in sexual activity, and as a tonic.

In combination with other herbs, jambolan seed is used for constipation, diseases of the pancreas, stomach problems, nervous disorders, depression, and exhaustion.

Jambolan is sometimes applied directly to the mouth and throat to reduce pain due to swelling (inflammation). It is also applied directly to the skin for skin ulcers and inflammation of the skin.

Possibly Ineffective for...

  • Diabetes (jambolan leaf). There is some evidence that drinking jambolan tea prepared from 2 grams jambolan leaves per liter of water does not improve fasting blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. However, research in animals suggests that the seed and bark might lower blood sugar, but this effect has not been shown in people. Other research suggests that jambolan seed might also lower cholesterol in people who have high cholesterol due to diabetes. But again, this benefit has not been shown in people.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Bronchitis.
  • Asthma.
  • Severe diarrhea (dysentery).
  • Intestinal gas (flatulence).
  • Spasms.
  • Stomach problems.
  • Increasing sexual desire (aphrodisiac).
  • Constipation, in combination with other herbs.
  • Exhaustion, in combination with other herbs.
  • Depression, in combination with other herbs.
  • Nervous disorders, in combination with other herbs.
  • Pancreas problems, in combination with other herbs.
  • Skin ulcers, when applied to the skin.
  • Sore mouth and throat, when applied to the affected area.
  • Skin swelling (inflammation) when applied to the skin.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of jambolan for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).


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