Recommended Topic Related To:

Jevtana

"The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Xofigo (radium Ra 223 dichloride) to treat men with symptomatic late-stage (metastatic) castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to bones but not to other organs. It is intended for"...

Jevtana

Warnings
Precautions

WARNINGS

Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section.

PRECAUTIONS

Neutropenia

Five patients experienced fatal infectious adverse events (sepsis or septic shock). All had grade 4 neutropenia and one had febrile neutropenia. One additional patient's death was attributed to neutropenia without a documented infection.

G-CSF may be administered to reduce the risks of neutropenia complications associated with JEVTANA use. Primary prophylaxis with G-CSF should be considered in patients with high-risk clinical features (age > 65 years, poor performance status, previous episodes of febrile neutropenia, extensive prior radiation ports, poor nutritional status, or other serious comorbidities) that predispose them to increased complications from prolonged neutropenia. Therapeutic use of G-CSF and secondary prophylaxis should be considered in all patients considered to be at increased risk for neutropenia complications.

Monitoring of complete blood counts is essential on a weekly basis during cycle 1 and before each treatment cycle thereafter so that the dose can be adjusted, if needed [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION)].

JEVTANA should not be administered to patients with neutrophils ≤ 1,500/mm³ [see CONTRAINDICATIONS].

If a patient experiences febrile neutropenia or prolonged neutropenia (greater than one week) despite appropriate medication (e.g., G-CSF), the dose of JEVTANA should be reduced [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. Patients can restart treatment with JEVTANA only when neutrophil counts recover to a level > 1,500/mm³ [see CONTRAINDICATIONS].

Hypersensitivity Reactions

All patients should be premedicated prior to the initiation of the infusion of JEVTANA [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. Patients should be observed closely for hypersensitivity reactions, especially during the first and second infusions. Hypersensitivity reactions may occur within a few minutes following the initiation of the infusion of JEVTANA, thus facilities and equipment for the treatment of hypotension and bronchospasm should be available. Severe hypersensitivity reactions can occur and may include generalized rash/erythema, hypotension and bronchospasm. Severe hypersensitivity reactions require immediate discontinuation of the JEVTANA infusion and appropriate therapy. Patients with a history of severe hypersensitivity reactions should not be re-challenged with JEVTANA [see CONTRAINDICATIONS].

Gastrointestinal Symptoms

Nausea, vomiting and severe diarrhea, at times, may occur. Death related to diarrhea and electrolyte imbalance occurred in the randomized clinical trial. Intensive measures may be required for severe diarrhea and electrolyte imbalance. Patients should be treated with rehydration, anti-diarrheal or anti-emetic medications as needed. Treatment delay or dosage reduction may be necessary if patients experience Grade ≥ 3 diarrhea [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Renal Failure

Renal failure, including four cases with fatal outcome, was reported in the randomized clinical trial. Most cases occurred in association with sepsis, dehydration, or obstructive uropathy [see ADVERSE REACTIONS]. Some deaths due to renal failure did not have a clear etiology. Appropriate measures should be taken to identify causes of renal failure and treat aggressively.

Elderly Patients

In the randomized clinical trial, 3 of 131 (2%) patients < 65 years of age and 15 of 240 (6%) ≥ 65 years of age died of causes other than disease progression within 30 days of the last cabazitaxel dose. Patients ≥ 65 years of age are more likely to experience certain adverse reactions, including neutropenia and febrile neutropenia [see ADVERSE REACTIONS and Use In Specific Populations].

Hepatic Impairment

No dedicated hepatic impairment trial for JEVTANA has been conducted. Patients with impaired hepatic function (total bilirubin ≥ ULN, or AST and/or ALT ≥ 1.5 ULN) were excluded from the randomized clinical trial.

Cabazitaxel is extensively metabolized in the liver, and hepatic impairment is likely to increase cabazitaxel concentrations.

Hepatic impairment increases the risk of severe and life-threatening complications in patients receiving other drugs belonging to the same class as JEVTANA. JEVTANA should not be given to patients with hepatic impairment (total bilirubin ≥ ULN, or AST and/or ALT ≥ 1.5 ULN).

Pregnancy

Pregnancy category D

JEVTANA can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. In non-clinical studies in rats and rabbits, cabazitaxel was embryotoxic, fetotoxic, and abortifacient at exposures significantly lower than those expected at the recommended human dose level.

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women using JEVTANA. If this drug is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus. Women of childbearing potential should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant during treatment with JEVTANA [see Use in Specific Populations].

Patient Counseling Information

See FDA-Approved Patient Labeling

  • Educate patients about the risk of potential hypersensitivity associated with JEVTANA. Confirm patients do not have a history of severe hypersensitivity reactions to cabazitaxel or to other drugs formulated with polysorbate 80. Instruct patients to immediately report signs of a hypersensitivity reaction.
  • Explain the importance of routine blood cell counts. Instruct patients to monitor their temperature frequently and immediately report any occurrence of fever to the treating oncologist.
  • Explain that it is important to take the oral prednisone as prescribed. Instruct patients to report if they were not compliant with oral corticosteroid regimen.
  • Explain to patients that severe and fatal infections, dehydration, and renal failure have been associated with cabazitaxel exposure. Patients should immediately report fever, significant vomiting or diarrhea, decreased urinary output, and hematuria to the treating oncologist.
  • Inform patients about the risk of drug interactions and the importance of providing a list of prescription and non-prescription drugs to the treating oncologist [see DRUG INTERACTIONS].
  • Inform elderly patients that certain side effects may be more frequent or severe.

Nonclinical Toxicology

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Long-term animal studies have not been performed to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of cabazitaxel.

Cabazitaxel was positive for clastogenesis in the in vivo micronucleus test, inducing an increase of micronuclei in rats at doses ≥ 0.5 mg/kg. Cabazitaxel increased numerical aberrations with or without metabolic activation in an in vitro test in human lymphocytes though no induction of structural aberrations was observed. Cabazitaxel did not induce mutations in the bacterial reverse mutation (Ames) test. The positive in vivo genotoxicity findings are consistent with the pharmacological activity of the compound (inhibition of tubulin depolymerization).

Cabazitaxel may impair fertility in humans. In a fertility study performed in female rats at cabazitaxel doses of 0.05, 0.1, or 0.2 mg/kg/day there was no effect of administration of the drug on mating behavior or the ability to become pregnant. There was an increase in pre-implantation loss at the 0.2 mg/kg/day dose and an increase in early resorptions at doses ≥ 0.1 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.02-0.06 times the human clinical exposure based on Cmax). In multi-cycle studies following the clinically recommended dosing schedule, atrophy of the uterus was observed at the 5 mg/kg dose level (approximately the AUC in patients with cancer at the recommended human dose) along with necrosis of the corpora lutea at doses ≥ 1 mg/kg (approximately 0.2 times the AUC at the clinically recommended human dose).

Cabazitaxel did not affect mating performances or fertility of treated male rats at doses of 0.05, 0.1, or 0.2 mg/kg/day. In multiple-cycle studies following the clinically recommended dosing schedule, however, degeneration of seminal vesicle and seminiferous tubule atrophy in the testis were observed in rats treated intravenously with cabazitaxel at a dose of 1 mg/kg (approximately 0.2-0.35 times the AUC in patients with cancer at the recommended human dose), and minimal testicular degeneration (minimal epithelial single cell necrosis in epididymis) was observed in dogs treated with a dose of 0.5 mg/kg (approximately one-tenth of the AUC in patients with cancer at the recommended human dose).

Use In Specific Populations

Pregnancy

Pregnancy category D

See WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS section.

JEVTANA can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of JEVTANA in pregnant women.

Non-clinical studies in rats and rabbits have shown that cabazitaxel is embryotoxic, fetotoxic, and abortifacient. Cabazitaxel was shown to cross the placenta barrier within 24 hours of a single intravenous administration of a 0.08 mg/kg dose (approximately 0.02 times the maximum recommended human dose-MRHD) to pregnant rats at gestational day 17.

Cabazitaxel administered once daily to female rats during organogenesis at a dose of 0.16 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.02-0.06 times the Cmax in patients with cancer at the recommended human dose) caused maternal and embryofetal toxicity consisting of increased post-implantation loss, embryolethality, and fetal deaths. Decreased mean fetal birth weight associated with delays in skeletal ossification were observed at doses ≥ 0.08 mg/kg (approximately 0.02 times the Cmax at the MRHD). In utero exposure to cabazitaxel did not result in fetal abnormalities in rats or rabbits at exposure levels significantly lower than the expected human exposures.

If this drug is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus. Women of childbearing potential should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant while taking JEVTANA.

Nursing Mothers

Cabazitaxel or cabazitaxel metabolites are excreted in maternal milk of lactating rats. It is not known whether this drug is excreted in human milk. Within 2 hours of a single intravenous administration of cabazitaxel to lactating rats at a dose of 0.08 mg/kg (approximately 0.02 times the maximum recommended human dose), radioactivity related to cabazitaxel was detected in the stomachs of nursing pups. This was detectable for up to 24 hours post-dose. Approximately 1.5% of the dose delivered to the mother was calculated to be delivered in the maternal milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from JEVTANA, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of JEVTANA in pediatric patients have not been established.

Geriatric Use

Based on a population pharmacokinetic analysis, no significant difference was observed in the pharmacokinetics of cabazitaxel between patients < 65 years (n=100) and older (n=70).

Of the 371 patients with prostate cancer treated with JEVTANA every three weeks plus prednisone, 240 patients (64.7%) were 65 years of age and over, while 70 patients (18.9%) were 75 years of age and over. No overall differences in effectiveness were observed between patients ≥ 65 years of age and younger patients. Elderly patients ( ≥ 65 years of age) may be more likely to experience certain adverse reactions. The incidence of neutropenia, fatigue, asthenia, pyrexia, dizziness, urinary tract infection and dehydration occurred at rates ≥ 5% higher in patients who were 65 years of age or greater compared to younger patients [see ADVERSE REACTIONS].

Renal Impairment

No dedicated renal impairment trial for JEVTANA has been conducted. Based on the population pharmacokinetic analysis, no significant difference in clearance was observed in patients with mild (50 mL/min ≤ creatinine clearance (CLcr) < 80 mL/min) and moderate renal impairment (30 mL/min ≤ CLcr < 50 mL/min). No data are available for patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Caution should be used in patients with severe renal impairment (CLcr < 30 mL/min) and patients with end-stage renal diseases.

Hepatic Impairment

No dedicated hepatic impairment trial for JEVTANA has been conducted. The safety of JEVTANA has not been evaluated in patients with hepatic impairment [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

As cabazitaxel is extensively metabolized in the liver, hepatic impairment is likely to increase the cabazitaxel concentrations. Patients with impaired hepatic function (total bilirubin ≥ ULN, or AST and/or ALT ≥ 1.5 ULN) were excluded from the randomized clinical trial.

Last reviewed on RxList: 10/16/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Warnings
Precautions
A A A

Jevtana - User Reviews

Jevtana User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Jevtana sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Cancer

Get the latest treatment options.


NIH talks about Ebola on WebMD