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Juvisync

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Juvisync

Juvisync

OVERDOSE

Sitagliptin

During controlled clinical trials in healthy subjects, single doses of up to 800 mg sitagliptin were administered. Maximal mean increases in QTc of 8.0 msec were observed in one study at a dose of 800 mg sitagliptin, a mean effect that is not considered clinically important [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. There is no experience with doses above 800 mg in humans. In Phase I multiple-dose studies, there were no dose-related clinical adverse reactions observed with sitagliptin with doses of up to 600 mg per day for periods of up to 10 days and 400 mg per day for up to 28 days.

In the event of an overdose, it is reasonable to employ the usual supportive measures, e.g., remove unabsorbed material from the gastrointestinal tract, employ clinical monitoring (including obtaining an electrocardiogram), and institute supportive therapy as dictated by the patient's clinical status.

Sitagliptin is modestly dialyzable. In clinical studies, approximately 13.5% of the dose was removed over a 3-to 4-hour hemodialysis session. Prolonged hemodialysis may be considered if clinically appropriate. It is not known if sitagliptin is dialyzable by peritoneal dialysis.

Simvastatin

Significant lethality was observed in mice after a single oral dose of 9 g/m². No evidence of lethality was observed in rats or dogs treated with doses of 30 and 100 g/m², respectively. No specific diagnostic signs were observed in rodents. At these doses the only signs seen in dogs were emesis and mucoid stools.

A few cases of overdosage with simvastatin have been reported; the maximum dose taken was 3.6 g. All patients recovered without sequelae. Supportive measures should be taken in the event of an overdose. The dialyzability of simvastatin and its metabolites in man is not known at present.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

JUVISYNC is contraindicated in the following conditions:

  • History of a serious hypersensitivity reaction, such as anaphylaxis or angioedema, to any component of this medication. [See WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS; ADVERSE REACTIONS]
  • Concomitant administration of strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., itraconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, HIV protease inhibitors, boceprevir, telaprevir, erythromycin, clarithromycin, telithromycin, nefazodone, and cobicistat-containing products) [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].
  • Concomitant administration of gemfibrozil, cyclosporine, or danazol [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].
  • Active liver disease, which may include unexplained persistent elevations in hepatic transaminase levels [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].
  • Women who are pregnant or may become pregnant. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides increase during normal pregnancy, and cholesterol or cholesterol derivatives are essential for fetal development. Because HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) decrease cholesterol synthesis and possibly the synthesis of other biologically active substances derived from cholesterol, simvastatin may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Atherosclerosis is a chronic process and the discontinuation of lipid-lowering drugs during pregnancy should have little impact on the outcome of long-term therapy of primary hypercholesterolemia. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of use with JUVISYNC during pregnancy; however, in rare reports congenital anomalies were observed following intrauterine exposure to statins. In rat and rabbit animal reproduction studies, simvastatin revealed no evidence of teratogenicity. JUVISYNC should be administered to women of childbearing age only when such patients are highly unlikely to conceive. If the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, JUVISYNC should be discontinued immediately and the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus [see Use In Specific Populations].
  • Nursing mothers. Because statins have the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants, women who require treatment with JUVISYNC should not breastfeed their infants. A small amount of another drug in the statin class passes into breast milk. It is not known whether simvastatin is excreted into human milk [see Use In Specific Populations].

Last reviewed on RxList: 3/11/2014
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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