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Kariva

"Oct. 18, 2012 -- While the use of long-acting intrauterine devices (IUDs) is increasing, 1 in 9 women at risk for unintended pregnancies is not using any birth control, according to a new government report.

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Kariva

Indications
Dosage
How Supplied

INDICATIONS

Kariva™ (desogestrel and ethinyl estradiol and ethinyl estradiol) (desogestrel/ethinyl estradiol and ethinyl estradiol)Tablets are indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women who elect to use this product as a method of contraception.

Oral contraceptives are highly effective. Table II lists the typical accidental pregnancy rates for users of combination oral contraceptives and other methods of contraception. The efficacy of these contraceptive methods, except sterilization, depends upon the reliability with which they are used. Correct and consistent use of these methods can result in lower failure rates.

TABLE II: Percentage of women experiencing an unintended pregnancy during the first year of typical use and the first year of perfect use of contraception and the percentage continuing use at the end of the first year, United States.

  % of Women Experiencing an Unintended Pregnancy within the First Year of Use % of Women
Continuing Use at One Year3
Method
(1)
Typical Use1
(2)
Perfect Use2
(3)
(4)
Chance4 85 85  
Spermicides5 26 6 40
Periodic abstinence 25   63
  Calendar   9  
  Ovulation Method   3  
  Sympto-Thermal6   2  
  Post-Ovulation   1  
Withdrawal 19 4  
Cap7
  Parous Women 40 26 42
  Nulliparous Women 20 9 56
Sponge
  Parous Women 40 20 42
  Nulliparous Women 20 9 56
Diaphragm7 20 6 56
Condom8
  Female (Reality) 21 5 56
  Male 14 3 61
Pill 5   71
  Progestin Only   0.5  
  Combined   0.1  
IUD
  Progesterone T 2.0 1.5 81
  Copper T 380A 0.8 0.6 78
  LNg 20 0.1 0.1 81
Depo-Provera 0.3 0.3 70
Norplant and Norplant-2 0.05 0.05 88
Female sterilization 0.5 0.5 100
Male sterilization 0.15 0.10 100
Adapted from Hatcher et al.,1998, Ref #1.
1Among typical couples who initiate use of a method (not necessarily for the first time), the percentage who experience an accidental pregnancy during the first year if they do not stop use for any other reason.
2Among couples who initiate use of a method (not necessarily for the first time) and who use it perfectly (both consistently and correctly), the percentage who experience an accidental pregnancy during the first year if they do not stop use for any other reason.
3Among couples attempting to avoid pregnancy, the percentage who continue to use a method for one year.
4The percents becoming pregnant in columns (2) and (3) are based on data from populations where contraception is not used and from women who cease using contraception in order to become pregnant. Among such populations, about 89% become pregnant within one year. This estimate was lowered slightly (to 85%) to represent the percent who would become pregnant within one year among women now relying on reversible methods of contraception if they abandoned contraception altogether.
5Foams, creams, gels, vaginal suppositories, and vaginal film.
6Cervical mucus (ovulation) method supplemented by calendar in the pre-ovulatory and basal body temperature in the post-ovulatory phases.
7With spermicidal cream or jelly.
8Without spermicides.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

To achieve maximum contraceptive effectiveness, Kariva™ (desogestrel and ethinyl estradiol and ethinyl estradiol) (desogestrel/ethinyl estradiol and ethinyl estradiol) Tablets must be taken exactly as directed and at intervals not exceeding 24 hours. Kariva™ (desogestrel and ethinyl estradiol and ethinyl estradiol) may be initiated using either a Sunday start or a Day 1 start.

NOTE: Each cycle pack dispenser is preprinted with the days of the week, starting with Sunday, to facilitate a Sunday start regimen. Six different “day label strips” are provided with each cycle pack dispenser in order to accommodate a Day 1 start regimen. In this case, the patient should place the self-adhesive “day label strip” that corresponds to her starting day over the preprinted days.

IMPORTANT: The possibility of ovulation and conception prior to initiation of use of Kariva™ (desogestrel and ethinyl estradiol and ethinyl estradiol) should be considered.

The use of Kariva™ (desogestrel and ethinyl estradiol and ethinyl estradiol) for contraception may be initiated 4 weeks postpartum in women who elect not to breast feed. When the tablets are administered during the postpartum period, the increased risk of thromboembolic disease associated with the postpartum period must be considered. (See CONTRAINDICATIONS and WARNINGS concerning thromboembolic disease. See also PRECAUTIONS for “Nursing Mothers”.) If the patient starts on Kariva™ (desogestrel and ethinyl estradiol and ethinyl estradiol) postpartum, and has not yet had a period, she should be instructed to use another method of contraception until a white tablet has been taken daily for 7 days.

Sunday Start

When initiating a Sunday start regimen, another method of contraception should be used until after the first 7 consecutive days of administration.

Using a Sunday start, tablets are taken daily without interruption as follows: The first white tablet should be taken on the first Sunday after menstruation begins (if menstruation begins on Sunday, the first white tablet is taken on that day). One white tablet is taken daily for 21 days, followed by 1 light-green (inert) tablet daily for 2 days and 1 light-blue (active) tablet daily for 5 days. For all subsequent cycles, the patient then begins a new 28-tablet regimen on the next day (Sunday) after taking the last light-blue tablet. [If switching from a Sunday Start oral contraceptive, the first desogestrel/ethinyl estradiol and ethinyl estradiol tablet should be taken on the second Sunday after the last tablet of a 21 day regimen or should be taken on the first Sunday after the last inactive tablet of a 28 day regimen.]

If a patient misses 1 white tablet, she should take the missed tablet as soon as she remembers. If the patient misses 2 consecutive white tablets in Week 1 or Week 2, the patient should take 2 tablets the day she remembers and 2 tablets the next day; thereafter, the patient should resume taking 1 tablet daily until she finishes the cycle pack. The patient should be instructed to use a back-up method of birth control if she has intercourse in the 7 days after missing pills. If the patient misses 2 consecutive white tablets in the third week or misses 3 or more white tablets in a row at any time during the cycle, the patient should keep taking 1 white tablet daily until the next Sunday. On Sunday the patient should throw out the rest of that cycle pack and start a new cycle pack that same day. The patient should be instructed to use a back-up method of birth control if she has intercourse in the 7 days after missing pills.

Day 1 Start

Counting the first day of menstruation as “Day 1”, tablets are taken without interruption as follows: One white tablet daily for 21 days, one light-green (inert) tablet daily for 2 days followed by 1 light-blue (ethinyl estradiol) tablet daily for 5 days. For all subsequent cycles, the patient then begins a new 28-tablet regimen on the next day after taking the last light-blue tablet. [If switching directly from another oral contraceptive, the first white tablet should be taken on the first day of menstruation which begins after the last ACTIVE tablet of the previous product.]

If a patient misses 1 white tablet, she should take the missed tablet as soon as she remembers. If the patient misses 2 consecutive white tablets in Week 1 or Week 2, the patient should take 2 tablets the day she remembers and 2 tablets the next day; thereafter, the patient should resume taking 1 tablet daily until she finishes the cycle pack. The patient should be instructed to use a back-up method of birth control if she has intercourse in the 7 days after missing pills. If the patient misses 2 consecutive white tablets in the third week or if the patient misses 3 or more white tablets in a row at any time during the cycle, the patient should throw out the rest of that cycle pack and start a new cycle pack that same day. The patient should be instructed to use a back-up method of birth control if she has intercourse in the 7 days after missing pills.

All Oral Contraceptives

Breakthrough bleeding, spotting, and amenorrhea are frequent reasons for patients discontinuing oral contraceptives. In breakthrough bleeding, as in all cases of irregular bleeding from the vagina, nonfunctional causes should be borne in mind. In undiagnosed persistent or recurrent abnormal bleeding from the vagina, adequate diagnostic measures are indicated to rule out pregnancy or malignancy. If both pregnancy and pathology have been excluded, time or a change to another preparation may solve the problem. Changing to an oral contraceptive with a higher estrogen content, while potentially useful in minimizing menstrual irregularity, should be done only if necessary since this may increase the risk of thromboembolic disease.

Use of oral contraceptives in the event of a missed menstrual period:

  1. If the patient has not adhered to the prescribed schedule, the possibility of pregnancy should be considered at the time of the first missed period and oral contraceptive use should be discontinued until pregnancy is ruled out.
  2. If the patient has adhered to the prescribed regimen and misses two consecutive periods, pregnancy should be ruled out before continuing oral contraceptive use.

HOW SUPPLIED

Kariva™ (desogestrel and ethinyl estradiol and ethinyl estradiol) (desogestrel/ethinyl estradiol and ethinyl estradiol) Tablets contain 21 round white coated tablets, 2 round light-green tablets and 5 round light-blue coated tablets in a blister card. Each white tablet (debossed with “Φ” on one side and “021” on the other side) contains 0.15 mg desogestrel and 0.02 mg ethinyl estradiol. Each round light-green tablet (debossed with “Φ” on one side and “331” on the other side) contains inert ingredients. Each light-blue tablet (debossed with “Φ” on one side and “022” on the other side) contains 0.01 mg ethinyl estradiol.

Boxes of 6 NDC # 0555-9050-58

STORAGE: Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted to 15°-30°C(59°-86°F). (See USP controlled room temperature)

REFERENCES

1. Hatcher RA, Trussell J, Stewart F et al. Contraceptive Technology: Seventeenth Revised Edition, New York: Irvington Publishers, 1998, in press.

2. Stadel BV. Oral contraceptives and cardiovascular disease. (Pt. 1). N Engl J Med 1981; 305:612-618.

3. Stadel BV. Oral contraceptives and cardiovascular disease. (Pt. 2). N Engl J Med 1981; 305:672-677.

20. Maguire MG, Tonascia J, Sartwell PE, Stolley PD, Tockman MS. Increased risk of thrombosis due to oral contraceptives: a further report. Am J Epidemiol 1979; 110 (2):188-195.

21. Pettiti DB, Wingerd J, Pellegrin F, Ramacharan S. Risk of vascular disease in women: smoking, oral contraceptives, noncontraceptive estrogens, and other factors. JAMA 1979; 242:1150-1154.

22. Vessey MP, Doll R. Investigation of relation between use of oral contraceptives and thromboembolic disease. Br Med J 1968; 2 (5599):199-205.

23. Vessey MP, Doll R. Investigation of relation between use of oral contraceptives and thromboembolic disease. A further report. Br Med J 1969; 2 (5658):651-657.

44. Shapiro S. Oral contraceptives-time to take stock. N Engl J Med 1987; 315:450-451.

90. Godsland, I et al. The effects of different formulations of oral contraceptive agents on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. N Engl J Med 1990; 323:1375-81.

93. Data on file, Organon Inc.

94. Fotherby, K. Oral contraceptives, lipids and cardiovascular diseases. Contraception, 1985; Vol. 31; 4:367-94.

95. Lawrence, DM et al. Reduced sex hormone binding globulin and derived free testosterone levels in women with severe acne. Clinical Endocrinology, 1981; 15:87-91.

Manufactured by barr laboratories, inc., Pomona, NY 10970. Rev. 3/02. FDA revision date: 10/04/02

Last reviewed on RxList: 8/5/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Indications
Dosage
How Supplied
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