June 26, 2016
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Keflex

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Keflex




CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Mechanism Of Action

Cephalexin is a cephalosporin antibacterial drug [see Microbiology].

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption

Cephalexin is acid stable and may be given without regard to meals. Following doses of 250 mg, 500 mg, and 1 g, average peak serum levels of approximately 9, 18, and 32 mcg/mL, respectively, were obtained at 1 hour. Serum levels were detectable 6 hours after administration (at a level of detection of 0.2 mcg/mL).

Distribution

Cephalexin is approximately 10% to 15% bound to plasma proteins.

Excretion

Cephalexin is excreted in the urine by glomerular filtration and tubular secretion. Studies showed that over 90% of the drug was excreted unchanged in the urine within 8 hours. During this period, peak urine concentrations following the 250 mg, 500 mg, and 1 g doses were approximately 1000, 2200, and 5000 mcg/mL respectively.

Drug Interactions

In healthy subjects given single 500 mg doses of cephalexin and metformin, plasma metformin mean Cmax and AUC increased by an average of 34% and 24%, respectively, and metformin mean renal clearance decreased by 14%. No information is available about the interaction of cephalexin and metformin following multiple doses of either drug.

Microbiology

Mechanism of Action

Cephalexin is a bactericidal agent that acts by the inhibition of bacterial cell-wall synthesis.

Resistance

Methicillin-resistant staphylococci and most isolates of enterococci are resistant to cephalexin. Cephalexin is not active against most isolates of Enterobacter spp., Morganella morganii, and Proteus vulgaris. Cephalexin has no activity against Pseudomonas spp., or Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae is usually cross-resistant to beta-lactam antibacterial drugs.

Antimicrobial Activity

Cephalexin has been shown to be active against most isolates of the following bacteria both in vitro and in clinical infections [see INDICATIONS AND USAGE].

Gram-positive Bacteria

Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin-susceptible isolates only)
Streptococcus pneumoniae
(penicillin-susceptible isolates)
Streptococcus pyogenes

Gram-negative Bacteria

Escherichia coli
Haemophilus influenzae

Klebsiella pneumoniae

Moraxella catarrhalis

Proteus mirabilis

Susceptibility Tests Methods

When available, the clinical microbiology laboratory should provide the results of in vitro susceptibility test results for antimicrobial drug products used in resident hospitals to the physician as periodic reports that describe the susceptibility profile of nosocomial and community-acquired pathogens. These reports should aid the physician in selecting an antibacterial drug product for treatment.

In cases of uncomplicated urinary tract infection only, susceptibility of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and P. mirabilis to cephalexin may be inferred by testing cefazolin2.

Dilution Techniques

Quantitative methods are used to determine antimicrobial minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). These MICs provide estimates of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. The MICs should be determined using a standardized test methods (broth or agar)1,2.

Diffusion Techniques

Quantitative methods that require measurement of zone diameters also provide reproducible estimates of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. The zone size provides an estimate of the susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial compounds. The zone size should be determined using a standardized test method2,3.

A report of Susceptible (S) indicates that the antimicrobial drug is likely to inhibit growth of the pathogen if the antimicrobial drug reaches the concentration usually achievable at the site of infection. A report of Intermediate (I) indicates that the result should be considered equivocal, and if the microorganism is not fully susceptible to alternative clinically feasible drugs, the test should be repeated. This category implies possible clinical applicability in body sites where the drug is physiologically concentrated or in situations where a high dosage of the drug can be used. This category also provides a buffer zone that prevents small uncontrolled technical factors from causing major discrepancies in interpretation. A report of Resistant (R) indicates that the antimicrobial drug is not likely to inhibit growth of the pathogen if the antimicrobial drug reaches the concentrations usually achievable at the infection site; other therapy should be selected.

Quality Control

Standardized susceptibility test procedures require the use of laboratory controls to monitor and ensure the accuracy and precision of supplies and reagents used in the assay, and the techniques of the individual performing the test1,2,3.

Last reviewed on RxList: 12/11/2015
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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