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Kinlytic

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Kinlytic

Kinlytic Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my health care provider before I receive urokinase (Kinlytic)?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to urokinase, or if you have:

  • internal bleeding;
  • a brain tumor;
  • a brain aneurysm (dilated blood vessel);
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder (such as hemophilia);
  • a condition called arterial hypertension;
  • if you have had a recent medical emergency requiring CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation);
  • if you have had a stroke, brain surgery, or spinal surgery within in the past 2 months.

If you have certain conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication. Before you receive urokinase, tell your doctor if you have:

  • a history of stroke;
  • severe liver or kidney disease;
  • eye problems caused by diabetes;
  • an infection of the lining of your heart (also called bacterial endocarditis);
  • a blood clot of your heart;
  • a recent history of stomach or intestinal bleeding;
  • if you are pregnant or have had a baby within the past 10 days; or
  • if you have had surgery or an organ transplant within the past 10 days.

FDA pregnancy category B. Urokinase is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. However, your doctor should know if you are pregnant before you receive this medication.

It is not known whether urokinase passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Urokinase is made from human kidney cells and albumin (part of the blood) and it may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human blood is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

How is urokinase given (Kinlytic)?

Urokinase is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting.

Urokinase is given slowly, usually over a period of 12 hours, using a continuous infusion pump.

Your breathing, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other vital signs will be watched closely while you are receiving urokinase.

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