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Knee Bursitis (cont.)

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How is prepatellar bursitis of the knee treated?

The treatment of any bursitis depends on whether or not it involves infection. Aseptic prepatellar bursitis can be treated with ice compresses, rest, and anti-inflammatory and pain medications. Occasionally, it requires aspiration of the bursa fluid. This procedure involves removal of the fluid with a needle and syringe under sterile conditions and can be performed in the doctor's office. Sometimes the fluid is sent to the laboratory for further analysis. Noninfectious knee bursitis can also be treated with an injection of cortisone medication into the swollen bursa. This is sometimes done at the same time as the aspiration procedure.

Septic bursitis requires even further evaluation and treatment. The bursal fluid can be examined in the laboratory to identify the microbes causing the infection. It requires antibiotic therapy, often intravenously. Repeated aspiration of the inflamed fluid may be required. Surgical drainage and removal of the infected bursa sac (bursectomy) may also be necessary.

What about the other knee bursae?

A second bursa of the knee is located just under the kneecap beneath the large tendon that attaches the muscles in front of the thigh and the kneecap to the prominent bone in front of the lower leg. This bursa is called the infrapatellar bursa, and when inflamed, the condition is called infrapatellar bursitis. It is commonly seen with inflammation of the adjacent tendon as a result of a jumping injury, hence the name "jumper's knee." This condition is generally treated with ice, rest, and oral anti-inflammatory and/or pain medicines.

A third bursa of the knee is called the "anserine bursa." It is located on the lower inner side of the knee. This bursa most commonly becomes inflamed in middle-aged women. This condition is referred to as anserine bursitis. Anserine bursitis is particularly common in those who are obese. These patients can notice pain in the inner knee while climbing or descending stairs. Anserine bursitis is generally treated with ice, rest, and oral anti-inflammatory and/or pain medicines, although cortisone injections are also given.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/27/2012

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Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/knee_bursitis/article.htm

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