October 7, 2015
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Knee Injury and Meniscus Tears (cont.)

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What causes a knee injury?

Most knee injuries are caused by an external force bending or twisting the knee in a manner that it was not anatomically designed for. The vast majority of knee injuries are from a twisting mechanism from falls, sports, or accidents. This twisting can cause damage to the ligaments and cartilage.

High-force injuries such as sports injuries and motor vehicle accidents can disrupt multiple parts of the knee anatomy, causing multiple types of knee injuries.

Bursitis can be caused by overuse, arthritis, degenerative joint disease, injuries from kneeling, infection, or gout.

What are risk factors for a knee injury?

High-impact sports, including running, basketball, football, hockey, soccer, cycling, and others, can increase the risk of knee injury. Sports where shoes with cleats are worn and sharp, sudden changes in direction are made are common risks for knee injury.

The elderly may be at higher risk for knee injury due to falls and osteoporosis.

Women may be at higher risk for particular knee injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and patella. This is due to the anatomy of a woman's hips and femur and the angle at which the knee is tilted. This can lead to chondromalacia patella (CMP), an inflammation or irritation of the underside of the patella.

Being overweight can be a risk factor for knee injury, as excess weight puts more stress on the lower extremity joints.

Overuse and overtraining, improper or insufficient training for a sport, or not properly rehabilitating acute injuries can also predispose a person to knee injuries.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/21/2015

Source: MedicineNet.com

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