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Lanoxin Tablets

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Lanoxin

Lanoxin

WARNINGS

Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section.

PRECAUTIONS

Ventricular Fibrillation in patients with Accessory AV Pathway (Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome)

Patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome who develop atrial fibrillation are at high risk of ventricular fibrillation. Treatment of these patients with digoxin leads to greater slowing of conduction in the atrioventricular node than in accessory pathways, and the risks of rapid ventricular response leading to ventricular fibrillation are thereby increased.

Sinus Bradycardia and Sino-atrial Block

LANOXIN may cause severe sinus bradycardia or sinoatrial block particularly in patients with pre-existing sinus node disease and may cause advanced or complete heart block in patients with pre-existing incomplete AV block. Consider insertion of a pacemaker before treatment with digoxin

Digoxin Toxicity

Signs and symptoms of digoxin toxicity include anorexia, nausea, vomiting, visual changes and cardiac arrhythmias [first-degree, second-degree (Wenckebach), or third-degree heart block (including asystole); atrial tachycardia with block; AV dissociation; accelerated junctional (nodal) rhythm; unifocal or multiform ventricular premature contractions (especially bigeminy or trigeminy); ventricular tachycardia; and ventricular fibrillation]. Toxicity is usually associated with digoxin levels > 2ng/ml although symptoms may also occur at lower levels. Low body weight, advanced age or impaired renal function, hypokalemia, hypercalcemia, or hypomagnesemia may predispose to digoxin toxicity. Obtain serum digoxin levels in patients with signs or symptoms of digoxin therapy and interrupt or adjust dose if necessary [see ADVERSE REACTIONS and OVERDOSAGE]. Assess serum electrolytes and renal function periodically.

The earliest and most frequent manifestation of digoxin toxicity in infants and children is the appearance of cardiac arrhythmias, including sinus bradycardia. In children, the use of digoxin may produce any arrhythmia. The most common are conduction disturbances or supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, such as atrial tachycardia (with or without block) and junctional (nodal) tachycardia. Ventricular arrhythmias are less common. Sinus bradycardia may be a sign of impending digoxin intoxication, especially in infants, even in the absence of first-degree heart block. Any arrhythmias or alteration in cardiac conduction that develops in a child taking digoxin should initially be assumed to be a consequence of digoxin intoxication.

Given that adult patients with heart failure have some symptoms in common with digoxin toxicity, it may be difficult to distinguish digoxin toxicity from heart failure. Misidentification of their etiology might lead the clinician to continue or increase LANOXIN dosing, when dosing should actually be suspended. When the etiology of these signs and symptoms is not clear, measure serum digoxin levels.

Decreased Cardiac Output in Patients With Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function

Patients with heart failure associated with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction may experience decreased cardiac output with use of Lanoxin. . Such disorders include restrictive cardiomyopathy, constrictive pericarditis, amyloid heart disease, and acute cor pulmonale. Patients with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis may have worsening of the outflow obstruction due to the inotropic effects of digoxin. Patients with amyloid heart disease may be more susceptible to digoxin toxicity at therapeutic levels because of an increased binding of digoxin to extracellular amyloid fibrils.

LANOXIN should generally be avoided in these patients, although it has been used for ventricular rate control in the subgroup of patients with atrial fibrillation.

Reduced Efficacy In Patients with Hypocalcemia

Hypocalcemia can nullify the effects of digoxin in humans; thus, digoxin may be ineffective until serum calcium is restored to normal. These interactions are related to the fact that digoxin affects contractility and excitability of the heart in a manner similar to that of calcium.

Risk of Ventricular Arrhythmias During Electrical Cardioversion

It may be desirable to reduce the dose of or discontinue digoxin for 1 to 2 days prior to electrical cardioversion of atrial fibrillation to avoid the induction of ventricular arrhythmias, but physicians must consider the consequences of increasing the ventricular response if digoxin is decreased or withdrawn. If digitalis toxicity is suspected, elective cardioversion should be delayed. If it is not prudent to delay cardioversion, the lowest possible energy level should be selected to avoid provoking ventricular arrhythmias.

Altered Response in Thyroid Disorders and Hypermetabolic States

Hypothyroidism may reduce the requirements for digoxin.

Heart failure and/or atrial arrhythmias resulting from hypermetabolic or hyperdynamic states (e.g., hyperthyroidism, hypoxia, or arteriovenous shunt) are best treated by addressing the underlying condition. Atrial arrhythmias associated with hypermetabolic states are particularly resistant to digoxin treatment. Patients with beri beri heart disease may fail to respond adequately to digoxin if the underlying thiamine deficiency is not treated concomitantly.

Risk of Ischemia in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction

Digoxin is not recommended in patients with acute myocardial infarction because undesirable increases in myocardial oxygen demand and ischemia may result.

Vasoconstriction In Patients with Myocarditis

Digoxin can precipitate vasoconstriction and may promote production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, therefore should be avoided in patients with myocarditis.

Nonclinical Toxicology

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Digoxin showed no genotoxic potential in in vitro studies (Ames test and mouse lymphoma). No data are available on the carcinogenic potential of digoxin, nor have studies been conducted to assess its potential to affect fertility.

Use In Specific Populations

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category C

Digoxin should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed. It is also not known whether digoxin can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproductive capacity. Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with digoxin.

Labor and Delivery

There is not enough data from clinical trials to determine the safety and efficacy of digoxin during labor and delivery.

Nursing Mothers

Studies have shown that digoxin distributes into breast milk, and that the milk-to-serum concentration ratio is approximately 0.6 to 0.9. However, the estimated exposure of a nursing infant to digoxin via breastfeeding is far below the usual infant maintenance dose. Therefore, this amount should have no pharmacologic effect upon the infant. Nevertheless, caution should be exercised when digoxin is administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of LANOXIN in the control of ventricular rate in children with atrial fibrillation in children have not been established.

The safety and effectiveness of LANOXIN in the treatment of heart failure in children have not been established in adequate and well-controlled studies. However, in published literature of children with heart failure due to various etiologies (e.g., ventricular septal defects, anthracycline toxicity, patent ductus arteriosus), treatment with digoxin has been associated with improvements in hemodynamic parameters, and in clinical signs and symptoms.

Newborn infants display considerable variability in their tolerance to digoxin. Premature and immature infants are particularly sensitive to the effects of digoxin, and the dosage of the drug must not only be reduced but must be individualized according to their degree of maturity.

Geriatric Use

The majority of clinical experience gained with digoxin has been in the elderly population. This experience has not identified differences in response or adverse effects between the elderly and younger patients. However, this drug is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of toxic reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken in dose selection, which should be based on renal function, and it may be useful to monitor renal function [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Renal Impairment

The clearance of digoxin can be primarily correlated with the renal function as indicated by creatinine clearance. Tables 2 and 4 provides the usual daily maintenance dose requirements for digoxin based on creatinine clearance (per 70 kg or per 1.73 m) [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Digoxin is primarily excreted by the kidneys; therefore, patients with impaired renal function require smaller than usual maintenance doses of digoxin [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. Because of the prolonged elimination half-life, a longer period of time is required to achieve an initial or new steady-state serum concentration in patients with renal impairment than in patients with normal renal function. If appropriate care is not taken to reduce the dose of digoxin, such patients are at high risk for toxicity, and toxic effects will last longer in such patients than in patients with normal renal function.

Hepatic Impairment

Plasma digoxin concentrations in patients with acute hepatitis generally fall within the range of profiles in a group of healthy subjects.

Malabsorption

The absorption of digoxin is reduced in some malabsorption conditions such as chronic diarrhea.

Last reviewed on RxList: 8/29/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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