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LASIK Eye Surgery (cont.)

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What are the risks of LASIK?

LASIK has been shown to be a very effective procedure, and most patients are very happy with their vision following the procedure. However, like any surgical procedure, LASIK does come with some risks. In order for you to decide whether LASIK surgery is right for you, you need to be aware of potential risks and complications and weigh these carefully before proceeding with surgery.

  1. You may be over-corrected or under-corrected. Most patients are satisfied with their vision after a single treatment, but in some cases, you may not achieve quality vision initially and need a second surgery, called an enhancement, to sharpen your vision. Patients with more extreme prescriptions are at higher risk for needing an enhancement. This enhancement cannot be performed for many months after your initial surgery to allow for your eyes to heal appropriately from the first surgery and for your eyeglass prescription to stabilize. In some rare cases, you may not be able to have an enhancement if your corneas are too thin or abnormally shaped after surgery.
  2. You may still need glasses or contact lenses after surgery to achieve your best vision. This is extremely rare for the average person; however, it is something you should discuss with your surgeon. In addition, if both of your eyes are corrected for good distance vision, you will still need glasses for close work when presbyopia develops as a part of normal aging process.
  3. Your results may not be permanent. Although uncommon, some patients do experience a regression of their desired treatment effect many years after the surgery. This is more common in patients with hyperopia, or farsightedness. Those who need reading glasses are especially prone to having changes in their vision after LASIK surgery. If regression does occur, it may be possible for you to have an additional surgery many years after your initial LASIK.
  4. You may experience visual aberrations, especially in low light. Visual effects that can occur with LASIK and decrease visual quality include: anisometropia (difference in refractive power between the two eyes), aniseikonia (difference in image size between the two eyes), double vision, hazy vision, fluctuating vision during the day and from day to day, increased sensitivity to light, glare, shadows, and seeing halos around lights. These visual aberrations are extremely unusual; however, they may be incapacitating for some time and may not ever go away completely.
  5. Dry eye symptoms may persist or get worse. Most people experience some dry-eye symptoms immediately after surgery. In some cases, people may develop worsening of dry-eye symptoms, such as burning and redness, or even decreased vision, after surgery. This condition is occasionally permanent and may require medication to improve tear production or punctal plugs, which temporarily close off the drainage system for tears.
  6. You may lose vision. Rarely, LASIK may result in worse vision that cannot be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. This could result from flap-related complications, equipment malfunction, infection, scarring, or extreme changes in corneal shape postoperatively.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/24/2014

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LASIK Eye Surgery - Experience Question: Please describe your recovery after LASIK eye surgery.
Lasik Eye Surgery - Preparation Question: Please describe how you prepared for LASIK eye surgery.
LASIK Eye Surgery - Test and Evaluation Question: Please describe your experience with your LASIK eye evaluation.
Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/lasik_eye_surgery/article.htm

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