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Legionnaire Disease and Pontiac Fever (cont.)

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What is the treatment for Legionnaires' disease?

There are three major classes of antibiotics that are effective in treating legionellosis. These include the fluoroquinolones such as levofloxacin (Levaquin), and moxifloxacin (Avelox), the macrolides such as erythromycin, azithromyocin (Zithromax), and clarithromycin (Biaxin), and the tetracyclines including doxycycline (Vibramycin). A new class of antibiotics (glycylcyclines) are also effective. The choice of antibiotic is often dependent on the patient's clinical state, tolerance to the medication, and degree of certainty as to the diagnosis. Zithromax and Levaquin are particularly effective because of decreased gastrointestinal irritation, higher potency, better penetration into tissue, and once-daily dosing.

In severe cases of Legionnaires' disease that seem more resistant to a single antibiotic, a second drug called rifampin (Rifadin) may be added.

Pontiac fever requires no specific treatment.

How is Legionnaires' disease spread?

Outbreaks of legionellosis have occurred after people have inhaled aerosols that come from a water source (for example, air-conditioning cooling towers, whirlpool spas, or showers) contaminated with Legionella bacteria. People may be exposed to these aerosols in homes, workplaces, hospitals, or public places. Infection cannot be acquired from another person with legionellosis, and there is no evidence of people becoming infected from auto air conditioners or household window air-conditioning units.

Cases of Legionnaires' disease have increased throughout the United States, but this most likely represents increased detection by better diagnostic tests. Some would suggest that this increase may be due to global warming, though this seems unlikely.

Hospital-acquired infections have occurred and are usually due to contamination of the water supply. Two well-reported cases occurred in the 1980s in Los Angeles, one at the Wadsworth VA hospital and the other at the City of Hope. Guidelines have now been established for routine environmental testing for Legionnaires' in several states in the United States and by the Veterans Affairs health-care system.

With regard to travel-associated infection, this usually occurs in hotels from contaminated water, most notably at the Legionnaires' convention in Philadelphia. This disease has also been associated with travel on cruise ships.

Some data suggest an increase incidence of Legionnaires' in the elderly in nursing homes linked to eating puréed food, probably also due to increased aspiration in this population.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/20/2014

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Legionnaires' Disease - Causes Question: How did you or someone you know contract Legionnaires' disease? Please share your experience.
Legionnaires' Disease - Symptoms Question: What were the symptoms associated with Legionnaires' disease in you, a friend, or relative?
Legionnaires' Disease - Diagnosis Question: What were the events, tests, or exams that led to a diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease?
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Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/legionnaire_disease_and_pontiac_fever/article.htm

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