July 23, 2016

Lemongrass

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What other names is Lemongrass known by?

Andropogon citratus, Andropogon flexuosus, British Indian Lemongrass, Capim-Cidrao, Ceylon Citronella Grass, Citronella, Citronnelle, Citronnelle de Ceylan, Citronnelle des Indes, Citronnelle de Java, Citronnelle de Madagascar, Cochin Lemongrass, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon flexuosus, Cymbopogon nardis, East Indian Lemongrass, Fever Grass, Guatemala Lemongrass, Herbe Citron, Hierba de Limón, Jonc Odorant, Lemon Grass, Madagascar Lemongrass, Verveine Indienne, West Indian Lemongrass.

What is Lemongrass?

Lemongrass is a plant. The leaves and the oil are used to make medicine.

Lemongrass is used for treating digestive tract spasms, stomachache, high blood pressure, convulsions, pain, vomiting, cough, achy joints (rheumatism), fever, the common cold, and exhaustion. It is also used to kill germs and as a mild astringent.

Some people apply lemongrass and its essential oil directly to the skin for headache, stomachache, abdominal pain, and muscle pain.

By inhalation, the essential oil of lemongrass is used as aromatherapy for muscle pain.

In food and beverages, lemongrass is used as a flavoring. For example, lemongrass leaves are commonly used as "lemon" flavoring in herbal teas.

In manufacturing, lemongrass is used as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics. Lemongrass is also used in making vitamin A and natural citral.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • High cholesterol. Early research suggests that taking lemongrass oil by mouth for 90 days does not reduce cholesterol levels in people with high cholesterol.
  • Yeast infection in the mouth (thrush). Early research suggests that drinking a lemongrass infusion for 10 days decreases thrush symptoms in people with HIV/AIDS better than applying a solution of gentian violet to the affected area.
  • Stomach and intestinal spasms.
  • Stomach ache.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Convulsions.
  • Pain.
  • Vomiting.
  • Cough.
  • Achy joints (rheumatism).
  • Fever.
  • Common cold.
  • Exhaustion.
  • Headache.
  • Use as an antiseptic and astringent.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of lemongrass for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).


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