July 30, 2016

Lutein

font size

How does Lutein work?

Lutein is one of two major carotenoids found as a color pigment in the human eye (macula and retina). It is thought to function as a light filter, protecting the eye tissues from sunlight damage.

Are there safety concerns?

Lutein is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately. Consuming 6.9-11.7 mg/day of lutein as part of the diet appears to be safe. Lutein supplements have been used safely in studies in doses up to 15 mg daily for up to 2 years.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Lutein is LIKELY SAFE when used in the amounts found in food.

Cystic fibrosis: People with cystic fibrosis might not absorb some carotenoids from food very well, and often have low blood levels of lutein. How much the body absorbs from lutein supplementation might also be decreased in people with cystic fibrosis.

Dosing considerations for Lutein.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • For reducing the risk of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD): 6 mg of lutein per day, either through diet or using supplements. People consuming 6.9 to 11.7 mg of lutein per day through diet had the lowest risk of developing AMD and cataracts.
  • For reducing symptoms of AMD: 10 mg per day of lutein supplements.
There is 44 mg of lutein per cup of cooked kale, 26 mg/cup of cooked spinach, and 3 mg/cup of broccoli.


Therapeutic Research Faculty copyright

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


WebMD Daily

Get breaking medical news.

Related Drugs
Health Resources
advertisement
advertisement
Use Pill Finder Find it Now See Interactions

Pill Identifier on RxList

  • quick, easy,
    pill identification

Find a Local Pharmacy

  • including 24 hour, pharmacies

Interaction Checker

  • Check potential drug interactions
Search the Medical Dictionary for Health Definitions & Medical Abbreviations