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M-M-R II

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M-M-R II

M-M-R II

M-M-R II Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: M-M-R II

Generic Name: measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine (Pronunciation: MEE zels, MUMPS, and roo BEL a)

What is measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (M-M-R II)?

Measles, mumps, and rubella are serious diseases caused by viruses. They are spread from person to person through the air.

Measles virus can cause minor symptoms such as skin rash, cough, runny nose, eye irritation, or mild fever. It can also cause more serious symptoms such as ear infection, pneumonia, seizures, permanent brain damage, or death.

Mumps virus causes fever, headache, and swollen glands, but more serious symptoms include hearing loss, and painful swelling of the testicles or ovaries. Mumps can cause breathing problems or meningitis, and these infections can be fatal.

Rubella virus (also called German Measles) causes skin rash, mild fever, and joint pain. Becoming infected with rubella during pregnancy can result in a miscarriage or serious birth defects.

The measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine is used to help prevent these diseases in children and adults.

This vaccine works by exposing you to a small dose of the virus or protein from the virus, which causes the body to develop immunity to the disease. This vaccine will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine is for use in children between the ages of 12 months and 6 years old, and in adults who have never received the vaccine or had the diseases.

Like any vaccine, the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine may not provide protection from disease in every person.

What are the possible side effects of this vaccine (M-M-R II)?

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. When you receive a booster dose, you will need to tell the doctor if the previous shots caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with measles, mumps, or rubella is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • problems with hearing or vision;
  • extreme drowsiness, fainting;
  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;
  • seizure (black-out or convulsions); or
  • high fever (within a few hours or a few days after the vaccine).

Less serious side effects include:

  • redness, pain, swelling, or a lump where the shot was given;
  • headache, dizziness;
  • low fever;
  • joint or muscle pain; or
  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.

Read the M-M-R II (measles, mumps, and rubella virus vaccine live) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine (M-M-R II)?

The measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine is given in a series of shots. The first shot is usually given to a child who is 12 to 15 month old. The booster shots are then given between 4 and 6 years of age. At least 28 days (4 weeks) should pass between the first and second doses of this vaccine.

Adults born after 1956 should receive at least one MMR vaccination if they have never had the diseases or received an MMR vaccine during their lifetime.

Your booster schedule may be different from these guidelines. Follow your doctor's instructions or the schedule recommended by your local health department.

Be sure to receive all recommended doses of this vaccine. You may not be fully protected against disease if you do not receive the full series.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. When you receive a booster dose, you will need to tell the doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with measles, mumps, or rubella is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Side Effects Centers
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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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