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Marijuana (cont.)

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What is marijuana, and how is it abused?

Marijuana is a plant whose scientific name is Cannabis sativa. Its leaves, seeds, stems, and/or roots are consumed by marijuana users for the purpose of feeling intoxicated ("high"). Although the plant contains hundreds of compounds, the one that has major intoxicating effects is called tetrahydrocannibinol (THC). Although medical marijuana is legal in a few states of the United States, it is one of many illegal drugs in most jurisdictions. Specifically, laws in most states deem it illegal to engage in possession of marijuana, either for the purpose of your own use or for the purpose of distributing it to others.

Marijuana is the most commonly abused illegal substance worldwide. While the number of people who use marijuana at any one time does not seem to have increased in the past decade, the number of people who have a marijuana-related disorder has increased significantly. This seems to be particularly true for elderly individuals as well as for young Hispanic and African-American adults. In teens, boys remain more likely than girls to smoke or otherwise use marijuana. Native-American adolescents seem to be the ethnic group most vulnerable to engage in recent marijuana use, and Asian adolescents tend to be the least likely.

What is medical marijuana? How is medical marijuana prescribed?

Medical marijuana, also called marinol (Dronabinol), is a synthetic form of marijuana. It comes in 2.5 mg, 5 mg, and 10 mg capsules and is used for the treatment of poor appetite and food intake (anorexia) with weight loss in people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and for the nausea and vomiting due to cancer chemotherapy in individuals who have not responded adequately to usual treatments for those symptoms. When used for appetite stimulation, marinol is usually dosed at 2.5 mg once or twice per day before lunch, dinner, and/or bedtime. When it is being prescribed to quell nausea, it is usually prescribed at 5 mg, one to three hours before a chemotherapy treatment and every two to four hours after chemotherapy, up to six doses per day.

The most common physical side effects of marinol include asthenia (lack of energy), stomach upset, nausea, vomiting, racing heart rate, facial flushing, and dizziness. The most common psychological side effects of marinol include anxiety, sleepiness, confusion, hallucinations, and paranoia. This medication should therefore be used with caution in persons who have a mental-health diagnosis, particularly depression, mood swings, schizophrenia, or substance abuse. When prescribed for those people, the individual is usually under the care of a psychiatrist.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/17/2014

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Marijuana Abuse - Personal History and Experience Question: What is your history with pot? Please share your experience with marijuana use, abuse, and addiction.
Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/marijuana/article.htm

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