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Melasma (cont.)

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What melasma treatments can I have at my doctor's office?

In conjunction with home cream applications, in-office treatments include chemical peels (chemical exfoliation), microdermabrasion (mechanical exfoliation), and laser therapy. These additional treatments may be useful for some cases of melasma, although laser still has issues with reproducibility.

Many types and strengths of chemical peels are available for different skin types. The type of peel should be tailored for each individual and selected by the physician. In treating melasma, 30%-70% glycolic acid peels are very common. Various combinations, including a mix of 10% glycolic acid and 2% HQ, can be used to treat melasma.

Microdermabrasion utilizes vacuum suction and an abrasive material like fine diamond chips or aluminum oxide crystals to exfoliate the top layers of the skin. The vacuum pressure is adjusted depending on the sensitivity and tolerance of the skin. Typical microdermabrasion sessions can last anywhere from a few minutes to one hour. Minimal to no recovery time is needed after microdermabrasion. Microdermabrasion techniques can improve melasma, but dramatic results are not generally seen or expected after one or two treatments. Multiple treatments in combination with sunscreen and other creams yield best results.

There is no guarantee that melasma will be improved with these procedures. In some cases, if treatments are too harsh or abrasive, melasma can be induced or worsen. Additionally, these procedures are almost always considered cosmetic and may not be covered by medical insurance providers.

Do lasers work for melasma?

Lasers may be used in melasma, but they generally produce only temporary results. Laser therapy is not the primary choice to treat melasma as studies reveal little to no improvement in the hyperpigmentation for most patients. Lasers may actually worsen some types of melasma and should be used with caution. Multiple laser treatments may be necessary to see results, as treatments are most effective when they are repeated.

To ensure that treatment doesn't fail, people must minimize sun exposure. People who treat their melasma report a better quality of life because they feel better about themselves. As with any treatment, people should consult their physician. Pregnant women or mothers breastfeeding may need to wait to treat melasma. Many melasma creams need to be discontinued in pregnancy and breastfeeding because of possible risks to the developing fetus and newborn. These people may consider cosmetics to temporarily conceal the skin discoloration.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/9/2013

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Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/melasma/article.htm

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