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Meridia

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Meridia

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Mode of Action

Sibutramine produces its therapeutic effects by norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine reuptake inhibition. Sibutramine and its major pharmacologically active metabolites (M1 and M2) do not act via release of monoamines.

Pharmacodynamics

Sibutramine exerts its pharmacological actions predominantly via its secondary (M1) and primary (M2) amine metabolites. The parent compound, sibutramine, is a potent inhibitor of serotonin (5­hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and norepinephrine reuptake in vivo, but not in vitro . However, metabolites M1 and M2 inhibit the reuptake of these neurotransmitters both in vitro and in vivo.

In human brain tissue, M1 and M2 also inhibit dopamine reuptake in vitro , but with ~3-fold lower potency than for the reuptake inhibition of serotonin or norepinephrine.

Potencies of Sibutramine, M1 and M2 as In Vitro Inhibitors of Monoamine Reuptake in Human Brain Potency to Inhibit Monoamine Reuptake (Ki;nM)

  Serotonin Norepinephrine Dopamine
Sibutramine 298 5451 943
M1 15 20 49
M2 20 15 45

A study using plasma samples taken from sibutramine-treated volunteers showed monoamine reuptake inhibition of norepinephrine > serotonin > dopamine; maximum inhibitions were norepinephrine = 73%, serotonin = 54% and dopamine = 16%.

Sibutramine and its metabolites (M1 and M2) are not serotonin, norepinephrine or dopamine releasing agents. Following chronic administration of sibutramine to rats, no depletion of brain monoamines has been observed.

Sibutramine, M1 and M2 exhibit no evidence of anticholinergic or antihistaminergic actions. In addition, receptor binding profiles show that sibutramine, M1 and M2 have low affinity for serotonin (5-HT1, 5­HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C), norepinephrine (β, β1, β3, α1 and α2), dopamine (D1 and D2), benzodiazepine, and glutamate (NMDA) receptors. These compounds also lack monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity in vitro and in vivo.

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption

Sibutramine is rapidly absorbed from the GI tract (Tmax of 1.2 hours) following oral administration and undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism in the liver (oral clearance of 1750 L/h and half-life of 1.1 h) to form the pharmacologically active mono- and di-desmethyl metabolites M1 and M2. Peak plasma concentrations of M1 and M2 are reached within 3 to 4 hours. On the basis of mass balance studies, on average, at least 77% of a single oral dose of sibutramine is absorbed. The absolute bioavailability of sibutramine has not been determined.

Distribution

Radiolabeled studies in animals indicated rapid and extensive distribution into tissues: highest concentrations of radiolabeled material were found in the eliminating organs, liver and kidney. In vitro, sibutramine, M1 and M2 are extensively bound (97%, 94% and 94%, respectively) to human plasma proteins at plasma concentrations seen following therapeutic doses.

Metabolism

Sibutramine is metabolized in the liver principally by the cytochrome P450 (3A4) isoenzyme, to desmethyl metabolites, M1 and M2. These active metabolites are further metabolized by hydroxylation and conjugation to pharmacologically inactive metabolites, M5 and M6. Following oral administration of radiolabeled sibutramine, essentially all of the peak radiolabeled material in plasma was accounted for by unchanged sibutramine (3%), M1 (6%), M2 (12%), M5 (52%), and M6 (27%).

M1 and M2 plasma concentrations reached steady-state within four days of dosing and were approximately two-fold higher than following a single dose. The elimination half-lives of M1 and M2, 14 and 16 hours, respectively, were unchanged following repeated dosing.

Excretion

Approximately 85% (range 68-95%) of a single orally administered radiolabeled dose was excreted in urine and feces over a 15-day collection period with the majority of the dose (77%) excreted in the urine. Major metabolites in urine were M5 and M6; unchanged sibutramine, M1, and M2 were not detected. The primary route of excretion for M1 and M2 is hepatic metabolism and for M5 and M6 is renal excretion.

Summary of Pharmacokinetic Parameters
Mean (% CV) and 95% Confidence Intervals of Pharmacokinetic Parameters (Dose = 15mg)

Study Population Cmax
(ng/mL)
Tmax
(h)
AUC†
(ng*h/mL)

(h)
Metabolite M1
Target Population:
Obese Subjects (n = 18) 4.0 (42) 3.6 (28) 25.5 (63) – –
  3.2 - 4.8 3.1 - 4.1 18.1 - 32.9  
Special Population:
Moderate Hepatic Impairment (n = 12) 2.2 (36) 3.3 (33) 18.7 (65) – –
  1.8 - 2.7 2.7 - 3.9 11.9 - 25.5  
Metabolite M2
Target Population:
Obese Subjects (n = 18) 6.4 (28) 3.5 (17) 92.1 (26) 17.2 (58)
5.6 - 7.2 3.2 - 3.8 81.2 - 103 12.5 - 21.8
Special Population:
Moderate Hepatic Impairment (n = 12) 4.3 (37) 3.8 (34) 90.5 (27) 22.7 (30)
3.4 - 5.2 3.1 - 4.5 76.9 - 104 18.9 - 26.5
† Calculated only up to 24 hr for M1.

Effect of Food

Administration of a single 20 mg dose of sibutramine with a standard breakfast resulted in reduced peak M1 and M2 concentrations (by 27% and 32%, respectively) and delayed the time to peak by approximately three hours. However, the AUCs of M1 and M2 were not significantly altered.

Special Populations

Geriatric

Plasma concentrations of M1 and M2 were similar between elderly (ages 61 to 77 yr) and young (ages 19 to 30 yr) subjects following a single 15-mg oral sibutramine dose. Plasma concentrations of the inactive metabolites M5 and M6 were higher in the elderly; these differences are not likely to be of clinical significance. Sibutramine is contraindicated in patients over 65 years of age (see CONTRAINDICATIONS).

Pediatric

The safety and effectiveness of sibutramine in pediatric patients under 16 years old have not been established.

Gender

Pooled pharmacokinetic parameters from 54 young, healthy volunteers (37 males and 17 females) receiving a 15-mg oral dose of sibutramine showed the mean Cmax and AUC of M1 and M2 to be slightly ( ≤ 19% and ≤ 36%, respectively) higher in females than males. Somewhat higher steady-state trough plasma levels were observed in female obese patients from a large clinical efficacy trial. However, these differences are not likely to be of clinical significance. Dosage adjustment based upon the gender of a patient is not necessary (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

Race

The relationship between race and steady-state trough M1 and M2 plasma concentrations was examined in a clinical trial in obese patients. A trend towards higher concentrations in Black patients over Caucasian patients was noted for M1 and M2. However, these differences are not considered to be of clinical significance.

Renal Insufficiency

The disposition of sibutramine metabolites (M1, M2, M5 and M6) following a single oral dose of sibutramine was studied in patients with varying degrees of renal function. Sibutramine itself was not measurable.

In patients with moderate and severe renal impairment, the AUC values of the active metabolite M 1 were 24 to 46% higher and the AUC values of M2 were similar as compared to healthy subjects. Cross- study comparison showed that the patients with end - stage renal disease on dialysis had similar AUC values of M1 but approximately half of the AUC values of M2 measured in healthy subjects (CLcr ≥ 80 mL/ min). The AUC values of inactive metabolites M5 and M6 increased 2 - 3 fold (range 1 - to 7 - fold) in patients with moderate impairment (30 mL/ min < CLcr = 60 mL/ min) and 8 - 11 fold (range 5 - to 15 - fold) in patients with severe impairment (CLcr ≤ 30 mL/ min) as compared to healthy subjects. Cross - study comparison showed that the AUC values of M5 and M6 increased 22 -33 fold in patients with end - stage renal disease on dialysis as compared to healthy subjects. Approximately 1% of the oral dose was recovered in the dialysate as a combination of M5 and M6during the hemodialysis process, while M1 and M2 were not measurable in the dialysate.

Sibutramine should not be used in patients with severe renal impairment, including those with end-stage renal disease on dialysis.

Hepatic Insufficiency

In 12 patients with moderate hepatic impairment receiving a single 15-mg oral dose of sibutramine, the combined AUCs of M1 and M2 were increased by 24% compared to healthy subjects while M5 and M6 plasma concentrations were unchanged. The observed differences in M1 and M2 concentrations do not warrant dosage adjustment in patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment. Sibutramine should not be used in patients with severe hepatic dysfunction.

Drug-Drug Interactions

In vitro studies indicated that the cytochrome P450 (3A4)-mediated metabolism of sibutramine was inhibited by ketoconazole and to a lesser extent by erythromycin. Phase 1 clinical trials were conducted to assess the interactions of sibutramine with drugs that are substrates and/or inhibitors of various cytochrome P450 isozymes. The potential for studied interactions is described below.

Ketoconazole

Concomitant administration of 200 mg doses of ketoconazole twice daily and 20 mg sibutramine once daily for 7 days in 12 uncomplicated obese subjects resulted in moderate increases in AUC and Cmax of 58% and 36% for M1 and of 20% and 19% for M2, respectively.

Erythromycin

The steady-state pharmacokinetics of sibutramine and metabolites M1 and M2 were evaluated in 12 uncomplicated obese subjects following concomitant administration of 500 mg of erythromycin three times daily and 20 mg of sibutramine once daily for 7 days. Concomitant erythromycin resulted in small increases in the AUC (less than 14%) for M1 and M2. A small reduction in Cmax for M1 (11%) and a slight increase in Cmax for M2 (10%) were observed.

Cimetidine

Concomitant administration of cimetidine 400 mg twice daily and sibutramine 15 mg once daily for 7 days in 12 volunteers resulted in small increases in combined (M1 and M2) plasma Cmax (3.4%) and AUC (7.3%).

Simvastatin

Steady-state pharmacokinetics of sibutramine and metabolites M1 and M2 were evaluated in 27 healthy volunteers after the administration of simvastatin 20 mg once daily in the evening and sibutramine 15 mg once daily in the morning for 7 days. Simvastatin had no significant effect on plasma Cmax and AUC of M2 or M1 and M2 combined. The Cmax (16%) and AUC (12%) of M1 were slightly decreased. Simvastatin slightly decreased sibutramine Cmax (14%) and AUC (21%). Sibutramine increased the AUC (7%) of the pharmacologically active moiety, simvastatin acid and reduced the Cmax (25%) and AUC (15%) of inactive simvastatin.

Omeprazole

Steady-state pharmacokinetics of sibutramine and metabolites M1 and M2 were evaluated in 26 healthy volunteers after the co-administration of omeprazole 20 mg once daily and sibutramine 15 mg once daily for 7 days. Omeprazole slightly increased plasma Cmax and AUC of M1 and M2 combined (approximately 15%). M2 Cmax and AUC were not significantly affected whereas M1 Cmax (30%) and AUC (40%) were modestly increased. Plasma Cmax (57%) and AUC (67%) of unchanged sibutramine were moderately increased. Sibutramine had no significant effect on omeprazole pharmacokineti cs.

Olanzapine

Steady-state pharmacokinetics of sibutramine and metabolites M1 and M2 were evaluated in 24 healthy volunteers after the co-administration of sibutramine 15 mg once daily with olanzapine 5 mg twice daily for 3 days and 10 mg once daily thereafter for 7 days. Olanza pine had no significant effect on plasma Cmax and AUC of M2 and M1 and M2 combined, or the AUC of M1. Olanzapine slightly increased M1 Cmax (19%), and moderately increased sibutramine Cmax (47%) and AUC (63%). Sibutramine had no significant effect on olanzapine pharmacokinetics.

Lorazepam

Steady-state pharmacokinetics of sibutramine and metabolites M1 and M2 after sibutramine 15 mg once daily for 11 days were compared in 25 healthy volunteers in the presence or absence of lorazepam 2 mg twice daily for 3 days plus one morning dose. Lorazepam had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of sibutramine metabolites M1 and M2. Sibutramine had no significant effect on lorazepam pharmacokinetics.

Drugs Highly Bound to Plasma Proteins

Although sibutramine and its active metabolites M1 and M2 are extensively bound to plasma proteins ( ≥ 94%), the low therapeutic concentrations and basic characteristics of these compounds make themunlikely to result in clinically significant protein binding interactions with other highly protein bound drugs such as warfarin and phenytoin. In vitro protein binding interaction studies have not been conducted.

Clinical Studies

Observational epidemiologic studies have established a relationship between obesity and the risks for cardiovascular disease, non-insulin depende nt diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), certain forms of cancer, gallstones, certain respiratory disorders, and an increase in overall mortality. These studies suggest that weight loss, if maintained, may produce health benefits for some patients with chronic obesity who may also be at risk for other diseases.

The long-term effects of sibutramine on the morbidity and mortality associated with obesity have not been established. Weight loss was examined in 11 double-blind, placebo-controlled obesity trials (BMI range across all studies 27-43) with study durations of 12 to 52 weeks and doses ranging from 1 to 30 mg once daily. Weight was significantly reduced in a dose-related manner in sibutramine­treated patients compared to placebo over the dose range of 5 to 20 mg once daily. In two 12-month studies, maximal weight loss was achieved by 6 months and statistically significant weight loss was maintained over 12 months. The amount of placebo-subtracted weight loss achieved on sibutramine was consistent across studies.

Analysis of the data in three long-term ( ≥ 6 months) obesity trials indicates that patients who lose at least 4 pounds in the first 4 weeks of therapy with a given dose of sibutramine are most likely to achieve significant long-term weight loss on that dose of sibutramine. Approximately 60% of such patients went on to achieve a placebo-subtracted weight loss of ≥ 5% of their initial body weight by month 6. Conversely, of those patients on a given dose of sibutramine who did not lose at least 4 pounds in the first 4 weeks of therapy, approximately 80% did not go on to achieve a placebo-subtracted weight loss of ≥ 5% of their initial body weight on that dose by month 6.

Significant dose-related reductions in waist circumference, an indicator of intra-abdominal fat, have also been observed over 6 and 12 months in placebo-controlled clinical trials. In a 12-week placebo-controlled study of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients randomized to placebo or 15 mg per day of sibutramine, Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) assessment of changes in body composition showed that total body fat mass decreased by 1.8 kg in the sibutramine group versus 0.2 kg in the placebo group (p < 0.001). Similarly, truncal (android) fat mass decreased by 0.6 kg in the sibutramine group versus 0.1 kg in the placebo group (p < 0.01). The changes in lean mass, fasting blood sugar, and HbA1 were not statistically significantly different between the two groups.

Eleven double-blind, placebo-controlled obesity trials with study durations of 12 to 52 weeks have provided evidence that sibutramine does not adversely affect glycemia, serum lipid profiles, or se rum uric acid in obese patients. Treatment with sibutramine (5 to 20 mg once daily) is associated with mean increases in blood pressure of 1 to 3 mm Hg and with mean increases in pulse rate of 4 to 5 beats per minute relative to placebo. These findings are similar in normotensives and in patients with hypertension controlled with medication. Those patients who lose significant ( ≥ 5% weight loss ) amounts of weight on sibutramine tend to have smaller increases in blood pressure and pulse rate (see WARNINGS).

In Study 1, a 6-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in obese patients, Study 2, a 1-year, double-blind, placebo-controll ed study in obese patients, and Study 3, a 1-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in obese patients who lost at least 6 kg on a 4-week very low calorie diet (VLCD), sibutramine produced significant reductions in weight, as shown below . In the two 1-year studies, maximal weight loss was achieved by 6 months and statistically significant weight loss was maintained over 12 months.

Mean Weight Loss (lbs) in the Six-Month and One-Year Trials

Study/Patient Group Placebo (n) S ibutramine(mg)
5 (n) 10 (n) 15 (n) 20 (n)
Study 1
  All patients* 2.0 6.6 9.7 12.1 13.6
(142) (148) (148) (150) (145)
  Completers** 2.9 8.1 12.1 15.4 18.0
(84) (103) (95) (94) (89)
  Early responders*** 8.5 13.0 16.0 18.2 20.1
(17) (60) (64) (73) (76)
Study 2
  All patients* 3.5   9.8 14.0  
(157)   (154) (152)  
  Completers** 4.8   13.6 15.2  
(76)   (80) (93)  
  Early responders*** 10.7   18.2 18.8  
(24)   (57) (76)  
Study 3****
  All patients* 15.2   28.4    
(78)   (81)    
  Completers** 16.7   29.7    
(48)   (60)    
  Early responders*** 21.5   33.0    
(22)   (46)    
* Data for all patients who received study drug and who had any post-baseline measurement (last observation carried forward analysis).
** Data for patients who completed the entire 6-month (Study 1) or one-year period of dosing and have data recorded for the month 6 (Study 1) or month 12 visit.
*** Data for patients who lost at least 4 lbs in the first 4 weeks of treatment and completed the study.
**** Weight loss data shown describe changes in weight from the pre-VLCD; mean weight loss during the 4-week VLCD was 16.9 lbs for sibutramine and 16.3 lbs for placebo.

Maintenance of weight loss with sibutramine was examined in a 2-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. After a 6-month run-in phase in which all patients received sibutramine 10 mg (mean weight loss, 26 lbs.), patients were randomized to sibutramine (10 to 20 mg, 352 patients) or placebo (115 patients). The mean weight loss from initial body weight to endpoint was 21 lbs. and 12 lbs. for sibutramine and placebo patients, respectively. A statistically significantly (p < 0.001) greater proportion of sibutramine treated patients, 75%, 62%, and 43%, maintained at least 80% of their initial weight loss at 12, 18, and 24 months, respectively, compared with the placebo group (38%, 23%, and 16%). Also 67%, 37%, 17%, and 9% of sibutramine treated patients compared with 49%, 19%, 5%, and 3% of placebo patients lost ≥ 5%, ≥ 10%, ≥ 15%, and ≥ 20%, respectively, of their initial body weight at endpoint. From endpoint to the post-study follow-up visit (about 1 month), weight regain was approximately 4 lbs for the sibutramine patients and approximately 2 lbs for the placebo patients.

Sibutramine induced weight loss has been accompanied by beneficial changes in serum lipids that are similar to those seen with nonpharmacologically-mediated weight loss. A combined, weighted analysis of the changes in serum lipids in 11 placebo-controlled obesity studies ranging in length from 12 to 52 weeks is shown below for the last observation carried forward (LOCF) analysis.

Combined Analysis (11 Studies) of Changes in Serum Lipids – LOCF

Category TG
% (n)
CHOL
% (n)
LDL-C
% (n)
HDL-C
% (n)
All Placebo 0.53 (475) -1.53 (475) -0.09 (233) -0.56 (248)
  < 5% Weight Loss 4.52 (382) -0.42 (382) -0.70 (205) -0.71 (217)
  ≥ 5% Weight Loss -15.30 (92) -6.23 (92) -6.19 (27) 0.94 (30 )
All Sibutramine -8.75 (1164) -2.21 (1165) -1.85 (642) 4.13 (664)
  < 5% Weight Loss -0.54 (547) 0.17 (548) -0.37 (320) 3.19 (331)
  ≥ 5% Weight Loss -16.59 (612) -4.87 (612) -4.56 (317) 4.68 (328)

Baseline mean values:

Placebo: TG 187 mg/dL; CHOL 221 mg/dL; LDL-C 140 mg/dL; HDL-C 47 mg/dL Sibutramine: TG 172 mg/dL; CHOL 215 mg/dL; LDL-C 140 mg/dL; HDL-C 47 mg/dL TG: Triglycerides, CHOL: Cholesterol, LDL-C Low Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol HDL-C: High Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol

Sibutramine induced weight loss has been accompanied by reductions in serum uric acid. Certain centrally-acting weight loss agents that cause release of serotonin from nerve terminals have been associated with cardiac valve dysfunction. The possible occurrence of cardiac valve disease w as specifically investigated in two studies. In one study 2-D and color Doppler echocardiography we re performed on 210 patients (mean age, 54 years) receiving sibutramine 15 mg or placebo daily for periods of 2 weeks to 16 months (mean duration of treatment, 7.6 months). In patients without a prior history of valvular heart disease, the incidence of valvular heart disease was 3/132 (2.3%) in the sibutramine treatment group (all three cases were mild aortic insufficiency) and 2/77 (2.6%) in the placebo treatment group (one case of mild aortic insufficiency and one case of severe aortic insufficiency). In another study, 25 patients underwent 2-D and color Doppler echocardiography before treatment with sibutramine and again after treatment with sibutramine 5 to 30 mg daily for three months; there were no cases of valvular heart disease.

The effect of sibutramine 15 mg once daily on measures of 24-hour blood pressure was evaluated in 12-week placebo-controlled study. Twenty-six male and female, primarily Cauasian individuals ac with an average BMI of 34 kg/m² and an average age of 39 years underwent 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). The mean changes from baseline to Week 12 in various measures of ABPM are shown in the following table.

Parameter mm Hg Systolic Diastolic
Placebo
n=12
Sibutramine Placebo Sibutramine
15 mg
n=14
20 mg
n=16
15 mg
n=12
20 mg
n=16
Daytime 0.2 3.9 4.4 0.5 5.0 5.7
Nighttime -0.3 4.1 6.4 -1.0 4.3 5.4
Early am -0.9 9.4 5.3 -3.0 6.7 5.8
24-hour mean -0.1 4.0 4.7 0.1 5.0 5.6

Normal diurnal variation of blood pressure was maintained.

Last reviewed on RxList: 1/31/2011
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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