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Methazolamide

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Methazolamide

Methazolamide Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Methazolamide is used to treat glaucoma. It is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. This medication is available in generic form. Common side effects include decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, or changes in taste, drowsiness, dizziness, fatigue, or weakness, nervousness or tremor, headache or confusion, increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight, worsening gout, loss of blood sugar control (if you are diabetic), ringing in your ears or hearing problems, or changes in vision.

The effective therapeutic dose of methazolamide varies from 50mg to 100mg, 2 or 3 times daily. The drug may be used at the same time as miotic and osmotic agents. Methazolamide may interact with cyclosporine, primidone, diflunisal, aspirin or other salicylates, or lithium. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy, methazolamide should be taken only if prescribed. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our methazolamide Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Patient Information in Detail?

Easy-to-read and understand detailed drug information and pill images for the patient or caregiver from Cerner Multum.

Methazolamide in Detail - Patient Information: Side Effects

If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking methazolamide and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately:

  • an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);
  • a sore throat or a fever;
  • unusual bleeding or bruising;
  • side or groin pain;
  • tingling or tremors in the hands or feet; or
  • a rash.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take methazolamide and talk to your doctor if you experience

  • decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, or changes in taste;
  • drowsiness, dizziness, fatigue, or weakness;
  • nervousness or tremor;
  • headache or confusion;
  • increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight;
  • worsening gout;
  • loss of blood sugar control (if you are diabetic);
  • ringing in your ears or hearing problems; or
  • changes in vision.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Methazolamide (Methazolamide) »

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Methazolamide FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

Adverse reactions, occurring most often early in therapy, include paresthesias, particularly a "tingling" feeling in the extremities; hearing dysfunction or tinnitus; fatigue; malaise; loss of appetite; taste alteration; gastrointestinal disturbances such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea; polyuria; and occasional instances of drowsiness and confusion.

Metabolic acidosis and electrolyte imbalance may occur.

Transient myopia has been reported. This condition invariably subsides upon diminution or discontinuance of the medication.

Other occasional adverse reactions include urticaria, melena, hematuria, glycosuria, hepatic insufficiency, flaccid paralysis, photosensitivity, convulsions, and, rarely, crystalluria and renal calculi. Also see PRECAUTIONS: Information for Patients for possible reactions common to sulfonamide derivatives. Fatalities have occurred, although rarely, due to severe reactions to sulfonamides including Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, fulminant hepatic necrosis, agranulocytosis, aplastic anemia, and other blood dyscrasias (see WARNINGS).

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Methazolamide (Methazolamide) »

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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