font size

Microsporidiosis (cont.)

Medical Author:
Medical Editor:

What symptoms does microsporidiosis cause?

Although microsporidiosis can occur in people with normal immune systems, it is very uncommon. The symptoms of microsporidiosis primarily occur in people with immune-system deficiency, such as HIV-infected individuals and organ-transplant recipients. Microsporidiosis can cause intestinal, lung, kidney, brain, sinus, muscle, or eye disease.

Intestinal symptoms that are caused by microsporidia infection include chronic diarrhea, wasting, malabsorption, and gallbladder disease. In patients with AIDS, the chronic diarrhea may be extremely debilitating and carries a significant mortality risk. The majority of cases of intestinal microsporidiosis in AIDS patients are caused by Enterocytozoon bieneusi.

Lung symptoms may include a cough and difficult, labored breathing. A chest X-ray may show signs of inflammation, fluid, or cavities in the lungs.

Microsporidiosis can cause infection in the urinary tract, kidney failure, bladder inflammation, and bowel perforation. Microsporidia can also spread throughout the body to cause inflammation in the brain, pancreas, sinuses, and muscle tissue.

Eye infection with microsporidia can cause inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva (keratoconjunctivitis). Symptoms of ocular microsporidiosis may include eye pain, eye redness, or blurry vision.

How is microsporidiosis diagnosed?

There are several tests available to diagnose microsporidia infection. Microscopic examination of stained samples of body fluids, primarily fecal samples, allows for rapid diagnosis, although the exact species of microsporidia may not be identified. Urine samples can also be used to detect spores when the kidney and/or bladder are involved.

A powerful microscope, called a transmission electron microscope, is needed to identify the species of microsporidia. However, this form of testing is expensive, and it is not available for routine use in all laboratories.

Other methods, such as immunofluorescence assays and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing, can also identify microsporidia infection in the research-laboratory setting.

Finally, blood tests and imaging studies can also assist in detecting microsporidiosis.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/15/2014

Patient Comments

Viewers share their comments

Microsporidiosis - Symptoms Question: What were your symptoms associated with microsporidiosis?
Microsporidiosis - Treatments Question: What kinds of treatment did you receive for microsporidiosis?
Microsporidiosis - Diagnosis Question: What types of tests and exams led to a diagnosis of microsporidiosis for you or someone you know?
Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/microsporidiosis/article.htm

Women's Health

Find out what women really need.

advertisement
advertisement
Use Pill Finder Find it Now See Interactions

Pill Identifier on RxList

  • quick, easy,
    pill identification

Find a Local Pharmacy

  • including 24 hour, pharmacies

Interaction Checker

  • Check potential drug interactions
Search the Medical Dictionary for Health Definitions & Medical Abbreviations

NIH talks about Ebola on WebMD