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Minocin

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Minocin

Minocin

Minocin Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking minocycline (Minocin)?

You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to minocycline or to other tetracycline antibiotics such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap).

To make sure you can safely take minocycline, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • liver disease;
  • kidney disease;
  • asthma or sulfite allergy; or
  • if you are also using a penicillin antibiotic such as amoxicillin (Amoxil, Augmentin, Dispermox, Moxatag), ampicillin (Principen, Unasyn), dicloxacillin (Dycill, Dynapen), oxacillin (Bactocill), or penicillin (Bicillin L-A, PC Pen VK, Pfizerpen).

If you are using minocycline to treat gonorrhea, your doctor may test you to make sure you do not also have syphilis, another sexually transmitted disease.

FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use minocycline if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby or cause permanent tooth discoloration later in life. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment.

Minocycline can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non hormone method of birth control (such as a condom, diaphragm, spermicide) to prevent pregnancy while using minocycline.

Minocycline passes into breast milk and may affect bone and tooth development in a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking minocycline.

Children should not use minocycline. Minocycline can cause permanent yellowing or graying of the teeth in children younger than 8 years old.

How should I take minocycline (Minocin)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with a full glass (8 ounces) of water.

Most brands of minocycline may be taken with or without food.

Take Minocin (pellet-filled capsules) on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Minocycline will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

To be sure this medicine is not causing harmful effects, your blood will need to be tested often. Your kidney, liver, or thyroid function may also need to be tested. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using minocycline. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Minocycline can cause false results with certain urine tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using this medication.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Throw away any unused minocycline when it expires or when it is no longer needed. Do not take any minocycline after the expiration date printed on the label. Using expired minocycline can cause damage to your kidneys.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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