Recommended Topic Related To:

Mitosol

"If you've ever been sleep-deprived, you've probably had a firsthand glimpse of the blood vessels in your eyes. But what you haven't seen—and what many eye care professionals cannot see as well as they would like—are the vessels closes"...

Mitosol

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Mechanism of Action

Mitosol® inhibits the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The guanine and cytosine content correlates with the degree of mitomycin-induced cross-linking. Cellular RNA and protein synthesis may also be suppressed.

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption

The systemic exposure of mitomycin following ocular administration of Mitosol® in humans is unknown. Based on a comparison of the proposed dose of up to 0.2 mg to intravenous (IV) doses of mitomycin used clinically for treatment of oncologic indications (up to 20 mg/m2), systemic concentrations in humans upon ocular administration are expected to be multiple orders of magnitude lower than those achieved by IV administration.

Metabolism

In humans, mitomycin is cleared from ophthalmic tissue after intraoperative topical application and irrigation, as metabolism occurs in other affected tissues. Systemic clearance is affected primarily by metabolism in the liver. The rate of clearance is inversely proportional to the maximal serum concentration because of saturation of the degradative pathways.

Excretion

Approximately 10% of an injectable dose of mitomycin is excreted unchanged in the urine. Since metabolic pathways are saturated at relatively low doses, the percent of a dose excreted in urine increases.

Clinical Studies

In placebo-controlled studies reported in the medical literature, mitomycin reduced intraocular pressure (IOP) by 3 mmHg in patients with open-angle glaucoma when used as an adjunct to ab externo glaucoma surgery by Month 12.

In studies with a historical control reported in the medical literature, mitomycin reduced intraocular pressure (IOP) by 5 mmHg in patients with open-angle glaucoma when used as an adjunct to ab externo glaucoma surgery by Month

Last reviewed on RxList: 2/22/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

A A A

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


WebMD Daily

Get breaking medical news.