June 28, 2016
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Mohs Surgery (cont.)

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What is the chance that my cancer will recur after Mohs surgery?

There is a very low chance that your skin cancer will recur after Mohs surgery. Cure rates have been reported as high as 96%-99%.

It is important to understand that no cancer treatment or surgery has a 100% cure rate. A skin cancer may recur or a new cancer may arise in the same or adjacent area even after Mohs or other surgery. Some skin cancers are more aggressive than others and need additional treatment and closer follow-up. Skin cancers frequently need additional follow-up and possible further treatment. Although MMS surgery tends to have the highest cure rate compared to other treatments, it may need to be supplemented by radiation or further surgery. Follow-up appointments with your physician are very important, especially in the first few years after surgery. Many patients are seen every four to six months after their diagnosis of a skin cancer. Monthly self-examinations of the skin are good practice for patients with a history of skin cancer. Any changing or new growth should be promptly checked by your physician. More regular follow-up appointments may be needed for those with more aggressive tumors or tumors in high-risk areas.

How many "levels" of Mohs surgery will I need?

On average, most patients may only need one or two levels before clearing the tumor. Depending on the skin cancer type and location, a patient may need anywhere from one to 10 or more levels to clear a tumor.

There is very little way to predict beforehand how large a skin cancer is because often there are invisible portions that can be seen only with the help of a microscope. Sometimes, more than one surgical procedure may be required to remove very large or invasive tumors, cancers in small areas or difficult areas, or to obtain the best medical and cosmetic result.

How are skin cancers treated?

There are many effective ways to treat skin cancers. Options include local radiation (X-ray) treatments, curettage and desiccation "C&D" (scrape and burn), cryosurgery (specialized deep freezing), photodynamic therapy using Levulan and laser and or blue light, regular surgical excision, laser removal and surgery, Mohs surgery, and several prescription creams, including imiquimod (Aldara) and fluorouracil (Efudex).

REFERENCES:

Blechman, Adam B., James W. Patterson, and Mark A. Russell. "Application of Mohs Micrographic Surgery Appropriate-Use Criteria to Skin Cancers at a University Health System." J Am Acad Dermatol 71.1 July 2014: 29-35.

Connolly, Suzanne M., et al. "AAD/ACMS/ASDSA/ASMS 2012 appropriate use criteria for Mohs micrographic surgery: A report of the American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Mohs Surgery, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Association, and the American Society for Mohs Surgery." J Am Acad Dermatol 67.4 (2012): 531-550.

Wood, Lance D. and Christie T. Ammirati. "An Overview of Mohs Micrographic Surgery for the Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma." Dermatol Clin 29 (2011): 153-160.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/3/2016

Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/mohs_surgery/article.htm

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