Myrbetriq

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Mechanism of Action

Mirabegron is an agonist of the human beta-3 adrenergic receptor (AR) as demonstrated by in vitro laboratory experiments using the cloned human beta-3 AR. Mirabegron relaxes the detrusor smooth muscle during the storage phase of the urinary bladder fill-void cycle by activation of beta-3 AR which increases bladder capacity. Although mirabegron showed very low intrinsic activity for cloned human beta-1 AR and beta-2 AR, results in humans indicate that beta-1 AR stimulation occurred at a mirabegron dose of 200 mg.

Pharmacodynamics

Urodynamics

The effects of Myrbetriq on maximum urinary flow rate and detrusor pressure at maximum flow rate were assessed in a urodynamic study consisting of 200 male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and BOO. Administration of Myrbetriq once daily for 12 weeks did not adversely affect the mean maximum flow rate or mean detrusor pressure at maximum flow rate in this study. Nonetheless, Myrbetriq should be administered with caution to patients with clinically significant BOO [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Cardiac Electrophysiology

The effect of multiple doses of Myrbetriq 50 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg once daily on QTc interval was evaluated in a randomized, placebo- and active- controlled (moxifloxacin 400 mg) four-treatment-arm parallel crossover study in 352 healthy subjects. In a study with demonstrated ability to detect small effects, the upper bound of the one-sided 95% confidence interval for the largest placebo adjusted, baseline-corrected QTc based on individual correction method (QTcI) was below 10 msec. For the 50 mg Myrbetriq dose group (the maximum approved dosage), the mean difference from placebo on QTcI interval at 4-5 hours post-dose was 3.7 msec (upper bound of the 95% CI 5.1 msec).

For the Myrbetriq 100 mg and 200 mg doses groups (dosages greater than the maximum approved dose and resulting in substantial multiples of the anticipated maximum blood levels at 50 mg), the mean differences from placebo in QTcI interval at 4-5 hours post-dose were 6.1 msec (upper bound of the 95% CI 7.6 msec) and 8.1 msec (upper bound of the 95% CI 9.8 msec), respectively. At the Myrbetriq 200 mg dose, in females, the mean effect was 10.4 msec (upper bound of the 95% CI 13.4 msec).

In this thorough QT study, Myrbetriq increased heart rate on ECG in a dose dependent manner. Maximum mean increases from baseline in heart rate for the 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg dose groups compared to placebo were 6.7 beats per minutes (bpm), 11 bpm, and 17 bpm, respectively. In the clinical efficacy and safety studies, the change from baseline in mean pulse rate for Myrbetriq 50 mg was approximately 1 bpm. In this thorough QT study, Myrbetriq also increased blood pressure in a dose dependent manner (see Effects on Blood Pressure).

Effects on Blood Pressure

In a study of 352 healthy subjects assessing the effect of multiple daily doses of 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg of Myrbetriq for 10 days on the QTc interval, the maximum mean increase in supine SBP/DBP at the maximum recommended dose of 50 mg was approximately 4.0/1.6 mm Hg greater than placebo. The 24-hour average increases in SBP compared to placebo were 3.0, 5.5, and 9.7 mm Hg at Myrbetriq doses of 50 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg, respectively. Increases in DBP were also dose-dependent, but were smaller than SBP.

In another study in 96 healthy subjects to assess the impact of age on pharmacokinetics of multiple daily doses of 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, and 300 mg of Myrbetriq for 10 days, SBP also increased in a dose-dependent manner. The mean maximum increases in SBP were approximately 2.5, 4.5, 5.5 and 6.5 mm Hg for Myrbetriq exposures associated with doses of 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg and 300 mg, respectively.

In three, 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, safety and efficacy studies (Studies 1, 2 and 3) in OAB patients receiving Myrbetriq 25 mg, 50 mg, or 100 mg once daily, mean increases in SBP/DBP compared to placebo of approximately 0.5 - 1 mm Hg were observed. Morning SBP increased by at least 15 mm Hg from baseline in 5.3%, 5.1%, and 6.7% of placebo, Myrbetriq 25 mg and Myrbetriq 50 mg patients, respectively. Morning DBP increased by at least 10 mm Hg in 4.6%, 4.1% and 6.6% of placebo, Myrbetriq 25 mg, and Myrbetriq 50 mg patients, respectively. Both SBP and DBP increases were reversible upon discontinuation of treatment.

Effect on Intraocular Pressure (IOP)

Myrbetriq 100 mg once daily did not increase IOP in healthy subjects after 56 days of treatment. In a phase 1 study assessing the effect of Myrbetriq on IOP using Goldmann applanation tonometry in 310 healthy subjects, a dose of Myrbetriq 100 mg was non-inferior to placebo for the primary endpoint of the treatment difference in mean change from baseline to day 56 in subject-average IOP; upper bound of the two-sided 95% CI of the treatment difference between Myrbetriq 100 mg and placebo was 0.3 mm Hg.

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption

After oral administration of mirabegron in healthy volunteers, mirabegron is absorbed to reach maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) at approximately 3.5 hours. The absolute bioavailability increases from 29% at a dose of 25 mg to 35% at a dose of 50 mg. Mean Cmax and AUC increase more than dose proportionally. This relationship is more apparent at doses above 50 mg. In the overall population of males and females, a 2-fold increase in dose from 50 mg to 100 mg mirabegron increased Cmax and AUCtau by approximately 2.9- and 2.6-fold, respectively, whereas a 4-fold increase in dose from 50 to 200 mg mirabegron increased Cmax and AUCtau by approximately 8.4- and 6.5-fold. Steady state concentrations are achieved within 7 days of once daily dosing with mirabegron. After once daily administration, plasma exposure of mirabegron at steady state is approximately double that seen after a single dose.

Effect of Food

Co-administration of a 50 mg tablet with a high-fat meal reduced mirabegron Cmax and AUC by 45% and 17%, respectively. A low-fat meal decreased mirabegron Cmax and AUC by 75% and 51%, respectively. In the phase 3 studies, mirabegron was administered irrespective of food contents and intake (i.e., with or without food) and demonstrated both safety and efficacy. Therefore, mirabegron can be taken with or without food at the recommended dose [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Distribution

Mirabegron is extensively distributed in the body. The volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) is approximately 1670 L following intravenous administration. Mirabegron is bound (approximately 71%) to human plasma proteins, and shows moderate affinity for albumin and alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. Mirabegron distributes to erythrocytes. Based on In vitro study erythrocyte concentrations of 14C-mirabegron were about 2-fold higher than in plasma.

Metabolism

Mirabegron is metabolized via multiple pathways involving dealkylation, oxidation, (direct) glucuronidation, and amide hydrolysis. Mirabegron is the major circulating component following a single dose of 14C-mirabegron. Two major metabolites were observed in human plasma and are phase 2 glucuronides representing 16% and 11% of total exposure, respectively. These metabolites are not pharmacologically active toward beta-3 adrenergic receptor. Although in vitro studies suggest a role for CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 in the oxidative metabolism of mirabegron, in vivo results indicate that these isozymes play a limited role in the overall elimination. In healthy subjects who are genotypically poor metabolizers of CYP2D6, mean Cmax and AUCtau were approximately 16% and 17% higher than in extensive metabolizers of CYP2D6, respectively. In vitro and ex vivo studies have shown the involvement of butylcholinesterase, uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) and possibly alcohol dehydrogenase in the metabolism of mirabegron, in addition to CYP3A4 and CYP2D6.

Excretion

Total body clearance (CLtot) from plasma is approximately 57 L/h following intravenous administration. The terminal elimination half-life (t½) is approximately 50 hours. Renal clearance (CLR) is approximately 13 L/h, which corresponds to nearly 25% of CLtot. Renal elimination of mirabegron is primarily through active tubular secretion along with glomerular filtration. The urinary elimination of unchanged mirabegron is dose-dependent and ranges from approximately 6.0% after a daily dose of 25 mg to 12.2% after a daily dose of 100 mg. Following the administration of 160 mg 14C-mirabegron solution to healthy volunteers, approximately 55% of the radioactivity dose was recovered in the urine and 34% in the feces. Approximately 25% of unchanged mirabegron was recovered in urine and 0% in feces.

Specific Populations

Geriatric Patients

The Cmax and AUC of mirabegron following multiple oral doses in elderly volunteers ( ≥ 65 years) were similar to those in younger volunteers (18 to 45 years).

Pediatric Patients

The pharmacokinetics of mirabegron in pediatric patients have not been evaluated [see Use In Specific Populations].

Gender

The Cmax and AUC of mirabegron were approximately 40% to 50% higher in females than in males. When corrected for differences in body weight, the mirabegron systemic exposure is 20% - 30% higher in females compared to males.

Race

The pharmacokinetics of mirabegron were comparable between Caucasians and African American Blacks. Cross studies comparison shows that the exposure in Japanese subjects is higher than that in North American subjects. However, when the Cmax and AUC were normalized for dose and body weight, the difference is smaller.

Renal Impairment

Following single dose administration of 100 mg mirabegron in volunteers with mild renal impairment (eGFR 60 to 89 mL/min/1.73 m² as estimated by MDRD), mean mirabegron Cmax and AUC were increased by 6% and 31% relative to volunteers with normal renal function. In volunteers with moderate renal impairment (eGFR 30 to 59 mL/min/1.73 m²), Cmax and AUC were increased by 23% and 66%, respectively. In patients with severe renal impairment (eGFR 15 to 29 mL/min/1.73 m²), mean Cmax and AUC values were 92% and 118% higher compared to healthy subjects with normal renal function. Mirabegron has not been studied in patients with End Stage Renal Disease-ESRD (CLcr less than 15 mL/min or eGFR less than 15 mL/min/1.73 m² or patients requiring hemodialysis).

Hepatic Impairment

Following single dose administration of 100 mg mirabegron in volunteers with mild hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class A), mean mirabegron Cmax and AUC were increased by 9% and 19% relative to volunteers with normal hepatic function. In volunteers with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class B), mean Cmax and AUC values were 175% and 65% higher. Mirabegron has not been studied in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class C).

Drug Interaction Studies

In Vitro Studies

Effect of Other Drugs on Mirabegron

Mirabegron is transported and metabolized through multiple pathways. Mirabegron is a substrate for CYP3A4, CYP2D6, butyrylcholinesterase, UGT, the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and the influx organic cation transporters (OCT) OCT1, OCT2, and OCT3. Sulfonylurea hypoglycemic agents glibenclamide (a CYP3A4 substrate), gliclazide (a CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 substrate) and tolbutamide (a CYP2C9 substrate) did not affect the in vitro metabolism of mirabegron.

Effect of Mirabegron on Other Drugs

Studies of mirabegron using human liver microsomes and recombinant human CYP enzymes showed that mirabegron is a moderate and time-dependent inhibitor of CYP2D6 and a weak inhibitor of CYP3A. Mirabegron is unlikely to inhibit the metabolism of co-administered drugs metabolized by the following cytochrome P450 enzymes: CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2E1 because mirabegron did not inhibit the activity of these enzymes at clinically relevant concentrations. Mirabegron did not induce CYP1A2 or CYP3A. Mirabegron inhibited P-gp-mediated drug transport at high concentrations. Mirabegron is predicted not to cause clinically relevant inhibition of OCT-mediated drug transport. Mirabegron did not affect the metabolism of glibenclamide or tolbutamide.

In Vivo Studies

The effect of co-administered drugs on the pharmacokinetics of mirabegron and the effect of mirabegron on the pharmacokinetics of co-administered drugs was studied after single and multiple doses of mirabegron. Most drugdrug interactions (DDI) were studied using mirabegron 100 mg extended-release tablets. However, interaction studies of mirabegron with metoprolol and with metformin were studied using mirabegron 160 mg immediate release (IR) tablets.

The effect of ketoconazole, rifampicin, solifenacin, tamsulosin, and metformin on systemic mirabegron exposure is shown in Figure 1.

The effect of mirabegron on metoprolol, desipramine, combined oral contraceptive-COC (ethinyl estradiol-EE, levonorgestrel-LNG), solifenacin, digoxin, warfarin, tamsulosin, and metformin is shown in Figure 2.

In these studies, the largest increase in mirabegron systemic exposure was seen in the ketoconazole DDI study. As a potent CYP3A4 inhibitor, ketoconazole increased mirabegron Cmax by 45% and mirabegron AUC by 80% after multiple dose administration of 400 mg of ketoconazole for 9 days prior to the administration of a single dose of 100 mg mirabegron in 23 male and females healthy subjects.

As a moderate CYP2D6 inhibitor, mirabegron increased the systemic exposure to metoprolol and desipramine:

  • Mirabegron increased the Cmax of metoprolol by 90% and metoprolol AUC by 229% after multiple doses of 160 mg mirabegron IR tablets once daily for 5 days and a single dose of 100 mg metoprolol tablet in 12 healthy male subjects administered before and concomitantly with mirabegron.
  • Mirabegron increased the Cmax of desipramine by 79% and desipramine AUC by 241% after multiple dose administration of 100 mg mirabegron once daily for 18 days and a single dose of 50 mg desipramine before and concomitantly with mirabegron in 28 male and female healthy subjects.

Caution is advised if Myrbetriq is co-administered with CYP2D6 substrates such as metoprolol and desipramine, and especially narrow therapeutic index drugs, such as thioridazine, flecainide, and propafenone [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS and DRUG INTERACTIONS].

Figures 1 and 2 show the magnitude of these interactions on the pharmacokinetic parameters and the recommendations for dose adjustment, if any:

Figure 1: The Effect of Co-administered Drugs on Exposure of Myrbetriq and Dose Recommendation

(1) Although no dose adjustment is recommended with solifenacin or tamsulosin based on the lack of pharmacokinetic interaction, Myrbetriq should be administered with caution to patients taking antimuscarinic medications for the treatment of OAB and in patients with clinically significant BOO because of the risk of urinary retention [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Figure 2: The Effect of Myrbetriq on Exposure of Co-administered Medication

The Effect of Myrbetriq on Exposure of Co-administered Medication - Illustration

  1. Since mirabegron is a moderate CYP2D6 inhibitor, the systemic exposure to CYP2D6 substrates such as metoprolol and desipramine is increased when co-administered with mirabegron. Therefore, appropriate monitoring and dose adjustment may be necessary, especially with narrow therapeutic index CYP2D6 substrates, such as thioridazine, flecainide, and propafenone [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS and DRUG INTERACTIONS].
  2. For patients who are initiating a combination of mirabegron and digoxin, the lowest dose for digoxin should initially be prescribed. Serum digoxin concentrations should be monitored and used for titration of the digoxin dose to obtain the desired clinical effect [see DRUG INTERACTION].
  3. Warfarin was administered as a single 25 mg dose of the racemate (a mixture of R-warfarin and S-warfarin). Based on this single dose study, mirabegron had no effect on the warfarin pharmacodynamic endpoints such as INR and prothrombin time. However, the effect of mirabegron on multiple doses of warfarin and on warfarin pharmacodynamic end points such as INR and prothrombin time has not been fully investigated [see DRUG INTERACTIONS].
  4. Although no dose adjustment is recommended with solifenacin or tamsulosin based on the lack of pharmacokinetic interaction, Myrbetriq should be administered with caution to patients taking antimuscarinic medications for the treatment of OAB and in BOO because of the risk of urinary retention [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Clinical Studies

Myrbetriq was evaluated in three, 12-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group, multicenter clinical trials in patients with overactive bladder with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and urinary frequency (Studies 1, 2, and 3). Entry criteria required that patients had symptoms of overactive bladder for at least 3 months duration, at least 8 micturitions per day, and at least 3 episodes of urgency with or without incontinence over a 3 day period. The majority of patients were Caucasian (94%) and female (72%) with a mean age of 59 years (range 18 – 95 years). The population included both na´ve patients who had not received prior antimuscarinic pharmacotherapy for overactive bladder (48%) and those who had received prior antimuscarinic pharmacotherapy for OAB (52%).

In Study 1, patients were randomized to placebo, Myrbetriq 50 mg, Myrbetriq 100 mg, or an active control once daily. In Study 2, patients were randomized to placebo, Myrbetriq 50 mg or Myrbetriq 100 mg once daily. In Study 3, patients were randomized to placebo, Myrbetriq 25 mg or Myrbetriq 50 mg once daily.

The co-primary efficacy endpoints in all 3 trials were (1) change from baseline to end of treatment (Week 12) in mean number of incontinence episodes per 24 hours and (2) change from baseline to end of treatment (Week 12) in mean number of micturitions per 24 hours, based on a 3-day micturition diary. An important secondary endpoint was the change from baseline to end of treatment (Week 12) in mean volume voided per micturition. Results for the co-primary endpoints and mean volume voided per micturition from Studies 1, 2, and 3 are shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Mean Baseline and Change from Baseline at Week 12‡ for Incontinence Episodes, Micturition Frequency, and Volume Voided per Micturition in Patients with Overactive Bladder in Studies 1, 2, and 3

Parameter Study 1 Study 2 Study 3
Placebo Myrbetriq 50 mg Placebo Myrbetriq 50 mg Placebo Myrbetriq 25 mg Myrbetriq 50 mg
Number of Incontinence Episodes per 24 Hours^
n 291 293 325 312 262 254 257
Baseline (mean) 2.67 2.83 3.03 2.77 2.43 2.65 2.51
Change from baseline (adjusted mean†) -1.17 -1.57 -1.13 -1.47 -0.96 -1.36 -1.38
Difference from placebo (adjusted mean†) -- -0.41 -- -0.34 -- -0.40 -0.42
  95% Confidence Interval -- (-0.72, -0.09) -- (-0.66, -0.03) -- (-0.74, -0.06) (-0.76, -0.08)
  p-value 0.003# 0.026# 0.005# 0.001#
Number of Micturitions per 24 Hours
n 480 473 433 425 415 410 426
Baseline (mean) 11.71 11.65 11.51 11.80 11.48 11.68 11.66
Change from baseline (adjusted mean†) -1.34 -1.93 -1.05 -1.66 -1.18 -1.65 -1.60
Difference from placebo (adjusted mean†) -- -0.60 -- -0.61 -- -0.47 -0.42
  95% Confidence Interval -- (-0.90, -0.29) -- (-0.98, -0.24) -- (-0.82, -0.13) (-0.76, -0.08)
  p-value < 0.001# 0.001# 0.007# 0.015#
Volume Voided (mL) per Micturition
n 480 472 433 424 415 410 426
Baseline (mean) 156.7 161.1 157.5 156.3 164.0 165.2 159.3
Change from baseline (adjusted mean†) 12.3 24.2 7.0 18.2 8.3 12.8 20.7
Difference from placebo (adjusted mean†) -- 11.9 -- 11.1 -- 4.6 12.4
  95% Confidence Interval -- (6.3, 17.4) -- (4.4, 17.9) -- (-1.6, 10.8) (6.3, 18.6)
  p-value < 0.001# 0.001# 0.15 < 0.001#
‡ Week 12 is last observation on treatment
† Least squares mean adjusted for baseline, gender, and geographical region
^For incontinence episodes per 24 hours, the analysis population is restricted to patients with at least 1 episode of incontinence at baseline.
#Statistically significantly superior compared to placebo at the 0.05 level with multiplicity adjustment

Myrbetriq 25 mg was effective in treating the symptoms of OAB within 8 weeks, and Myrbetriq 50 mg was effective in treating the symptoms of OAB within 4 weeks. Efficacy of both 25 mg and 50 mg doses of Myrbetriq was maintained through the 12-week treatment period.

Figures 3 through 8 show the co-primary endpoints, mean change from baseline (BL) over time in number of incontinence episodes per 24 hours and mean change from baseline over time in number of micturitions per 24 hours, in Studies 1, 2 and 3.

Figure 3: Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Incontinence Episodes per 24 Hours –Study 1

Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Incontinence Episodes per 24 Hours –Study 1 - Illustration

Figure 4: Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Micturitions per 24 Hours - Study 1

Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Micturitions per 24 Hours - Study 1 - Illustration

Figure 5: Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Incontinence Episodes per 24 Hours - Study 2

Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Incontinence Episodes per 24 Hours - Study 2 - Illustration

Figure 6: Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Micturitions per 24 Hours - Study 2

Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Micturitions per 24 Hours - Study 2 - Illustration

Figure 7: Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Incontinence Episodes per 24 Hours - Study 3

Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Incontinence Episodes per 24 Hours - Study 3 - Illustration

Figure 8: Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Micturitions per 24 Hours - Study 3

Mean (SE) Change from Baseline in Mean Number of Micturitions per 24 Hours - Study 3 - Illustration

Last reviewed on RxList: 3/25/2013
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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