Nabi-HB

Disclaimer

Nabi-HB

Nabi-HB Consumer (continued)

SIDE EFFECTS: Redness, pain, or tenderness at the injection site may occur. Nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, dizziness, headache, or back/joint pain may also occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Read the Nabi-HB (hepatitis b vaccine recombinant) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

PRECAUTIONS: Before receiving hepatitis B immune globulin, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or had a previous reaction to other immune globulins; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: bleeding/blood clotting problems, a certain immune system problem (immunoglobulin A deficiency).

This drug may make you dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Limit alcoholic beverages.

This medication is made from human blood. Even though the blood is carefully tested, and this medication goes through a special manufacturing process, there is an extremely small chance that you may get infections (such as hepatitis A) from the medication. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Some immune globulin products are made with maltose. This substance can cause false high blood sugar levels when your blood sugar is normal or even low. If you have diabetes, check with your doctor or pharmacist whether the product you are using contains maltose and whether your blood sugar testing supplies will work with this product. Rarely, serious problems have occurred when too much insulin was given because of false high sugar readings or when low blood sugar went untreated.

Tell your doctor of any recent/planned vaccinations. This medication may prevent a good response to live virus vaccines (such as measles, mumps, varicella). If you are vaccinated less than 14 days before receiving this medication or during the 3 months after receiving this medication, you may need to be vaccinated again or tested to see whether the vaccine was effective.

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is not known whether this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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