Nabi-HB

Nabi-HB

Nabi-HB Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: HepaGam B, HepaGam B NovaPlus, Hyperhep B, Nabi-HB

Generic Name: hepatitis B immune globulin (Pronunciation: HEP a TYE tis B im MYOON GLOB yoo lin)

What is hepatitis B immune globulin (Nabi-HB)?

Hepatitis B immune globulin is made from human plasma containing proteins that protect against the type B form of hepatitis (inflammation of the liver).

Hepatitis B immune globulin is used to prevent hepatitis B in people receiving a liver transplant, and in babies born to mothers infected with hepatitis B. It is also used to prevent hepatitis B in people who have been exposed to contaminated blood products, or through household or sexual contact with an infected person.

Hepatitis B immune globulin is not a vaccine. Therefore it will not provide long-term protection from hepatitis B. For long-term protection you must receive a hepatitis B vaccine such as Engerix-B, Recombivax HB, or Twinrix.

Hepatitis B immune globulin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of hepatitis B immune globulin (Nabi-HB)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure);
  • left-sided stomach pain; or
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

  • upset stomach, diarrhea;
  • tremors or shaking;
  • joint or back pain;
  • fever, chills;
  • headache; or
  • tired feeling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Nabi-HB (hepatitis b vaccine recombinant) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

What is the most important information I should know about hepatitis B immune globulin (Nabi-HB)?

Hepatitis B immune globulin is not a vaccine. Therefore it will not provide long-term protection from hepatitis B. For long-term protection you must receive a hepatitis B vaccine such as Engerix-B, Recombivax HB, or Twinrix.

You should not receive this medication if you are allergic to human globulins, or if you have an immunoglobulin A deficiency. Hepatitis B immune globulin should not be injected into your muscle if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia.

Hepatitis B immune globulin is made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested often. This will help your doctor determine how long to treat you with hepatitis B immune globulin. Your liver function will also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Do not receive a "live" vaccine while you are being treated with hepatitis B immune globulin, and for at least 3 months after your treatment ends. The live vaccine may not work as well during this time, and may not fully protect you from disease.

Side Effects Centers
A A A

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Women's Health

Find out what women really need.

advertisement
advertisement
Use Pill Finder Find it Now See Interactions

Pill Identifier on RxList

  • quick, easy,
    pill identification

Find a Local Pharmacy

  • including 24 hour, pharmacies

Interaction Checker

  • Check potential drug interactions
Search the Medical Dictionary for Health Definitions & Medical Abbreviations