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Naftin Gel

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Naftin Gel

Naftin Gel Patient Information including How Should I Take

Who should not use naftifine topical (Naftin Gel)?

Do not use naftifine topical if you have had an allergic reaction to it in the past.

It is not known whether naftifine topical will harm an unborn baby. Do not use naftifine topical without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether naftifine passes into breast milk. Do not use naftifine topical without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use naftifine topical (Naftin Gel)?

Use naftifine topical exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Wash your hands before and after using this medication.

Clean and dry the affected area. Apply the cream once daily, or the gel twice daily, as directed for the specified length of time.

Use this medication for the full amount of time prescribed by your doctor or recommended in the package even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely healed.

If the infection does not clear up in 4 weeks, or if it appears to get worse, see your doctor.

Do not use bandages or dressings that do not allow air circulation over the affected area (occlusive dressings) unless otherwise directed by your doctor. A light cotton-gauze dressing may be used to protect clothing.

Avoid getting this medication in your eyes, nose, or mouth.

Store naftifine topical at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

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