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Niaspan

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Niaspan

Niaspan Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: B-3-50, B3-500-Gr, Niacin SR, Niacor, Niaspan ER, Slo-Niacin

Generic Name: niacin (nicotinic acid) (Pronunciation: NYE a sin (NIK oh TIN ik AS id))

What is niacin (Niaspan)?

Niacin, also called nicotinic acid, is a B vitamin (vitamin B3). It occurs naturally in plants and animals, and is also added to many foods as a vitamin supplement. Niacin is also present in many multiple vitamins and nutritional supplements.

Niacin is used to treat and prevent a lack of natural niacin in the body, and to lower cholesterol and triglycerides (types of fat) in the blood. It is also used to lower the risk of heart attack in people with high cholesterol who have already had a heart attack. Niacin is sometimes used to treat coronary artery disease (also called atherosclerosis).

Niacin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

Niacin SR 125 mg-URL

brown/clear

Niaspan 500 mg

oblong, white, imprinted with KOS, 500

Niaspan ER 1000 mg

oblong, white, imprinted with 1000, KOS

Niaspan ER 750 mg

oblong, white, imprinted with 750, KOS

What are the possible side effects of niacin ?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • feeling light-headed, fainting;
  • fast, pounding, or uneven heart beats;
  • feeling short of breath;
  • swelling;
  • jaundice (yellowing of your skin or eyes); or
  • muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness with fever or flu symptoms and dark colored urine.

If you are diabetic, tell your doctor about any changes in your blood sugar levels.

Less serious side effects of niacin include:

  • mild dizziness;
  • warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin;
  • itching, dry skin;
  • sweating or chills;
  • nausea, diarrhea, belching, gas;
  • muscle pain, leg cramps; or
  • sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Niaspan (niacin) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

What is the most important information I should know about niacin?

Do not take this medication if you are allergic to niacin, or if you have severe liver disease, a stomach ulcer, or active bleeding.

Niacin can cause certain side effects, such as flushing (warmth, itching, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin). These effects can be made worse if you drink alcohol or hot beverages shortly after you take niacin. These effects should disappear over time as you keep taking the medication.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Avoid taking colestipol (Colestid) or cholestyramine (Locholest, Prevalite, Questran) at the same time you take niacin. If you take either of these other medications, take them at least 4 to 6 hours before or after you take niacin.

Niacin is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and other medications. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

Side Effects Centers
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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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