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Novolin 70-30 Innolet

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Novolin 70/30 Innolet

Novolin 70/30 Innolet

Novolin 70-30 Innolet Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Novolin 70/30 InnoLet [70% NPH, Human Insulin Isophane Suspension and 30% Regular, Human Insulin Injection (recombinant DNA origin)] is a form of insulin, a hormone produced in the body, used to treat diabetes. This medication is available over-the-counter. Common side effects include localized reactions such as red, swollen and itchy skin where the insulin has been injected.

Novolin 70/30 is a mixture of 70% NPH, Human Insulin Isophane Suspension and 30% Regular, Human Insulin Injection (recombinant DNA origin). The concentration of this product is 100 units of insulin per milliliter. Novolin 70/30 InnoLet may interact with other drugs. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Consult your doctor to discuss the best way to manage your diabetes while you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Our Novolin 70/30 [70% NPH, Human Insulin Isophane Suspension and 30% Regular, Human Insulin Injection (recombinant DNA origin)] Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Novolin 70-30 Innolet FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

A few people with diabetes develop red, swollen and itchy skin where the insulin has been injected. This is called a "local reaction" and it may occur if the injection is not properly made, if the skin is sensitive to the cleansing solution, or if you are allergic to the insulin being used. If you have a local reaction, tell your physician.

Generalized insulin allergy occurs rarely, but when it does it may cause a serious reaction, including skin rash over the body, shortness of breath, fast pulse, sweating, and a drop in blood pressure. If any of these symptoms develop, you should seek emergency medical care. If severe allergic reactions to insulin have occurred (i.e., generalized rash, swelling or breathing difficulties) you should be skin-tested with each new insulin preparation before it is used.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Novolin 70-30 Innolet (70% NPH, Human Insulin Isophane Suspension and 30% Regular, Human Insulin Injection) »

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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