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Novoseven

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Novoseven

Novoseven Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving coagulation factor VIIa (Novoseven)?

You should not receive coagulation factor VIIa if you are allergic to it.

If possible before you receive coagulation factor VIIa, tell your doctor if you have:

  • coronary artery disease (hardening of the arteries);
  • a history of stroke or heart attack;
  • a severe injury or infection;
  • liver disease; or
  • if you are allergic to mouse, hamster, or cow proteins.

In an emergency situation it may not be possible to tell your caregivers about your health conditions. Make sure any doctor caring for you afterward knows you have received this medicine.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether coagulation factor VIIa will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether coagulation factor VIIa passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while receiving this medicine.

In an emergency situation it may not be possible to tell your caregivers if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Make sure any doctor caring for your pregnancy or your baby knows you have received this medication.

How is coagulation factor VIIa given (Novoseven)?

Coagulation factor VIIa is injected into a vein through an IV. A healthcare provider will give you this injection.

You may need frequent medical tests to help your doctor determine how long to treat you with coagulation factor VIIa.

Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you have a bleeding disorder in case of emergency. Any medical care provider who treats you should know that you are using coagulation factor VIIa.

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