March 27, 2017
font size


Swimmer's Ear Infection (External Otitis)

Medical Author:
Medical Editor:

Swimmer's ear definition and facts

  • Swimmer's ear, or external otitis, is typically a bacterial infection of the skin of the outer ear canal. In contrast to a middle ear infection, swimmer's ear is an infection of the outer ear.
  • Swimmer's ear can occur in both acute and chronic forms.
  • Excessive water exposure and water trapped in the ear is a risk factor for developing swimmer's ear.
  • Frequent instrumentation (usually with cotton swabs) of the ear canal is another potential cause of external ear infection.
  • Early symptoms include
    • itchy ears,
    • a feeling of fullness,
    • swelling of the ear canal,
    • drainage, and
    • pain.
  • Home remedies to help prevent swimmer's ear include
  • Take measures to keep the ears dry at all times. Use ear plugs or a cotton ball with Vaseline on the outside to plug the ears when showering or swimming.
  • Don't scratch the inside of the ear because this may make the condition worse.
  • An ear drop preparation made of rubbing alcohol and vinegar can be used after swimming to remove water from the ears and help prevent swimmer's ear.
  • Antibiotic ear drops and avoidance of water in the ear are frequently necessary for treatment. If the ear is very swollen, a wick may need to be inserted in the ear canal to allow penetration of the ear drops.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions for use of any ear drops or medications
  • Proper ear care can avoid most infections.

What is "swimmer's ear" infection?

External otitis or "swimmer's ear" is an infection of the skin covering the outer ear and ear canal.

What causes swimmer's ear infection?

  • Acute external otitis is commonly a bacterial infection caused by Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, or Pseudomonas types of bacteria. Swimmer's ear infection usually is caused by excessive water exposure from swimming, diving, surfing, kayaking, or other water sports. When water collects in the ear canal (frequently trapped by wax), the skin can become soggy and serve as an inviting area for bacteria to grow.
  • Cuts or abrasions in the lining of the ear canal (for example, from cotton swab injury) also can predispose to bacterial infection of the ear canal.

What is chronic swimmer's ear?

Chronic (long-term) swimmer's ear is otitis externa that persists for longer than four weeks or that occurs more than four times a year. This condition can be caused by a

  • bacterial infection,
  • a skin condition (eczema or seborrhea),
  • fungal infection (Aspergillosis),
  • chronic irritation (such as from the use of hearing aids, insertion of cotton swabs, etc.),
  • allergy, chronic drainage from middle ear disease, tumors (rare), or
  • it may simply follow from a nervous habit of frequently scratching the ear.

In some people, more than one factor may be involved. For example, a person with eczema may subsequently develop black ear drainage. This would suggest of an accompanying fungal infection.

TThe standard treatments and preventative measures, as noted in the next sections, are often all that is needed to treat even a case of chronic otitis externa. However, in people with diabetes or those with suppressed immune systems, chronic swimmer's ear can become a serious disease (malignant external otitis). Malignant external otitis is a misnomer because it is not a tumor or a cancer, but rather an aggressive bacterial (typically Pseudomonas) infection of the base of the skull.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/16/2017

Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/otitis_externa/article.htm

Women's Health

Find out what women really need.

advertisement
advertisement
Use Pill Finder Find it Now See Interactions

Pill Identifier on RxList

  • quick, easy,
    pill identification

Find a Local Pharmacy

  • including 24 hour, pharmacies

Interaction Checker

  • Check potential drug interactions
Search the Medical Dictionary for Health Definitions & Medical Abbreviations