September 5, 2015
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Overactive Bladder (cont.)

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Are there any risk factors for overactive bladder?

Some of the common risk factors for overactive bladder include

  • advanced age,
  • injury to the nervous system,
    • stroke,
    • spinal cord injury,
    • dementia,
    • Parkinson's disease,
    • multiple sclerosis,
  • diabetes mellitus,
  • prostate enlargement,
  • prostate surgery,
  • multiple pregnancies,
  • previous pelvic surgery,
  • previous radiotherapy of the pelvis.

Race is not a risk factor for overactive bladder as it can affect people of all races.

What are overactive bladder symptoms?

The symptoms of an overactive bladder include frequent urination, urgency of urination, and nocturia (urinating in the middle of the night), with or without urge incontinence. Overactive bladder may cause significant social, psychological, occupational, domestic, physical, and sexual problems. Again, these symptoms should not be considered a normal part of aging.

How is overactive bladder diagnosed?

Careful medical history and diligent review of symptoms related to overactive bladder are very important. Getting up to urinate at least three times in the middle of the night, increased urinary frequency (urinating at least eight times daily), urinary urgency, and urinary incontinence are all important clues in evaluating someone suspected of having overactive bladder.

In addition to a general physical examination, a pelvic exam in women (to assess for dryness, atrophy, inflammation, and/or infection) and a prostate examination in men (to assess for size, tenderness, texture, and/or masses) are helpful in excluding other contributing conditions.

Urine analysis (UA) to assess for infections and occasionally urine cytology (to look for cancer cells in the bladder) are sometimes advised in individuals undergoing evaluation of urinary incontinence and overactive bladder. Ultrasound measurement of the amount of urine left in the bladder after urination (called post-void residual) may also provide additional information about the cause of urinary incontinence (obstruction to urine flow or weak bladder muscle).

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/26/2015

Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/overactive_bladder/article.htm

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