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Penis Disorders (cont.)

What causes Peyronie's disease?

The exact cause of Peyronie's disease is unknown. In people whose disease develops quickly, lasts a short time, and goes away without treatment, the likely cause is trauma (hitting or bending) that causes bleeding inside the penis. However, in some people, Peyronie's disease develops slowly and is severe enough to require surgical treatment. Other possible causes of Peyronie's disease include:

  • Vasculitis: This is an inflammation of blood or lymphatic vessels. This inflammation can lead to the formation of scar tissue.
  • Connective tissue disorders: According to the National Institutes of Health, about 30% of men with Peyronie's disease also develop disorders that affect the connective tissue in other parts of their bodies, such as the hands and feet. These conditions generally cause a thickening or hardening of the connective tissue. Connective tissue is specialized tissue -- such as cartilage, bone, and skin -- that acts to support other body tissues.
  • Heredity: Some studies suggest that a man who has a relative with Peyronie's disease is at greater risk for developing the disease himself.

How is Peyronie's disease treated?

There are two ways in which Peyronie's disease can be treated: surgery or non-surgical treatment.

Because the plaque of Peyronie's disease often shrinks or disappears without treatment, most doctors suggest waiting one to two years or longer before attempting to correct it with surgery. In many cases, surgery produces positive results. But because complications can occur, and because many of the problems associated with Peyronie's disease (for example, shortening of the penis) are not corrected by surgery, most doctors prefer to perform surgery only on men with curvatures so severe that sexual intercourse is impossible.

There are two surgical techniques used to treat Peyronie's disease. One method involves the removal of the plaque followed by placement of a patch of skin or artificial material (skin graft). With the second technique, the surgeon removes or pinches the tissue from the side of the penis opposite the plaque, which cancels out the bending effect. The first method can involve partial loss of erectile function, especially rigidity. The second method, known as the Nesbit procedure, causes a shortening of the erect penis.

Penile implants can be used in cases where Peyronie's disease has affected the man's ability to achieve or maintain an erection.

A non-surgical treatment for Peyronie's disease involves injecting medication directly into the plaque in an attempt to soften the affected tissue, decrease the pain, and correct the curvature of the penis. Vitamin E pills haves also been shown to benefit some men with Peyronie's disease.

Another, less invasive option is laser treatment to thin the plaques of Peyronie's disease.

© 2005-2014 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.
Source article on WebMD


Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/penis_disorders/article.htm


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