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Peripheral Vascular Disease (cont.)

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What are potential complications of peripheral artery disease?

In rare cases, the decreased circulation to the extremities characteristic of peripheral artery disease can lead to open sores that do not heal, ulcers, gangrene, or other injuries to the extremities. These areas that do not receive adequate blood flow are also more prone to develop infections and, in extreme cases, amputation may be necessary.

What are the other causes of peripheral vascular diseases?

A number of conditions such as vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels, occurring either as a primary condition or associated with connective tissue diseases such as lupus) may cause damage to blood vessels throughout the body. Injuries to blood vessels (from accidents such as auto accidents or sports injuries), blood-clotting disorders, and damage to blood vessels during surgery can also lead to tissue ischemia.

Tissue ischemia can also occur in the absence of atherosclerosis or other abnormalities of arteries. One example of a condition in which the blood vessels themselves are not damaged is Raynaud's disease, which is believed to occur due to spasms in blood vessels brought on bystress, tobacco smoking, or a cold environment.

Since atherosclerosis of the peripheral arteries (PAD) is by far the most common cause of peripheral vascular disease, the rest of this article focuses upon peripheral artery disease.

Who is at risk for peripheral artery disease?

Peripheral artery disease (or peripheral arterial disease) is a common condition that affects approximately ten million adults in the U.S. About 5% of people over the age of 50 are believed to suffer from peripheral artery disease. Peripheral artery disease is slightly more common in men than in women and most often occurs in older persons (over the age of 50). The known risk factors for peripheral artery disease are those that predispose to the development of atherosclerosis. Risk factors for peripheral artery disease include:

  • High blood levels of the bad LDL cholesterol and triglycerides
  • Low blood levels of the good HDL cholesterol
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Diabetes mellitus (both type 1 and type 2 diabetes)
  • High blood pressure (hypertension) or a family historyof hypertension
  • A family history of atherosclerotic disease
  • Chronic renal failure
  • Overweight or obesity
  • Physical inactivity

In peripheral artery disease, the risk factors are additive, so that a person with a combination of two risk factors -- diabetes and smoking, for example -- has an increased likelihood of developing more severe peripheral artery disease than a person with only onerisk factor.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/16/2014

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Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/peripheral_vascular_disease/article.htm

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