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Pitressin

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Pitressin

Discontinued Warning IconPlease Note: This Brand Name drug is no longer available in the US.
(Generic versions may still be available.)

Pitressin Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Pitressin

Generic Name: vasopressin (Pronunciation: vay soe PRES in)

What is vasopressin (Pitressin)?

Vasopressin is a man-made form of a hormone called "anti-diuretic hormone" that is normally secreted by the pituitary gland. In the body, vasopressin acts on the kidneys and blood vessels.

Vasopressin helps prevent the loss of water from the body by reducing urine output and helping the kidneys reabsorb water in the body. Vasopressin also raises blood pressure by constricting (narrowing) blood vessels.

Vasopressin is used to treat diabetes insipidus, which is caused by a lack of this naturally occurring pituitary hormone in the body. Vasopressin is also used to treat or prevent certain conditions of the stomach after surgery or during abdominal x-rays.

Vasopressin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of vasopressin (Pitressin)?

Some people receiving vasopressin have had an immediate reaction to the medication. Tell your caregiver right away if you feel weak, nauseated, light-headed, sweaty, or have a fast heartbeat, chest tightness, or weak breathing just after receiving vasopressin.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Tell your caregivers at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • slow or uneven heart rate;
  • gasping or trouble breathing;
  • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
  • tingling or loss of feeling in your hands or feet;
  • skin changes or discoloration;
  • swelling, rapid weight gain;
  • feeling light-headed, fainting; or
  • severe nausea or stomach pain.

Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

  • mild stomach pain, bloating, or gas;
  • dizziness; or
  • throbbing headache.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Pitressin (vasopressin) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

What is the most important information I should know about vasopressin (Pitressin)?

You should not receive this medication if you have a chronic kidney condition such as Bright's disease.

Before receiving vasopressin, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have asthma, kidney disease, congestive heart failure, hardened arteries, migraine headaches, or seizures.

Some people receiving vasopressin have had an immediate reaction to the medication. Tell your caregiver right away if you feel weak, nauseated, light-headed, sweaty, or have a fast heartbeat, chest tightness, or weak breathing just after receiving vasopressin.

Vasopressin can cause temporary side effects such as nausea, stomach pain, or "blanching" of your skin (such as pale spots when you press on the skin). Drinking 1 or 2 glasses of water each time you receive an injection may help ease these side effects.

Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink during your treatment with vasopressin. In some cases, drinking too much liquid can be as unsafe as not drinking enough.

Side Effects Centers
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Additional Pitressin Information

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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