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Platinol-AQ

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Platinol-AQ

Platinol-AQ Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Platinol AQ (cisplatin) Injection is a cancer medication used together with other medications to treat bladder cancer, testicular cancer, or ovarian cancer. The brand name of this medication is discontinued, but generic versions may be available. Common side effects include nausea and vomiting (may be severe), loss of appetite, diarrhea, and loss of taste. Temporary hair loss may occur. Normal hair growth should return after treatment has ended.

Platinol AQ dosing and schedule is individualized depending on the type of cancer being treated and tis severity. Platinol AQ may interact with altretamine, vitamin B6, seizure medications, medicines to treat a bowel disorder, medications to prevent organ transplant rejection, antiviral medications, pain or arthritis medicines, or any injected antibiotics. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Platinol AQ is not recommended for use during pregnancy. It may harm a fetus. Women should use birth control during treatment with this drug and for some time afterwards. This medication can affect sperm production in men. Men should use birth control during treatment and for some time afterwards. Consult your doctor for details. This drug passes into breast milk. Because of the potential risk to the infant, breastfeeding while using this drug is not recommended.

Our Platinol AQ (cisplatin) Injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Patient Information in Detail?

Easy-to-read and understand detailed drug information and pill images for the patient or caregiver from Cerner Multum.

Platinol-AQ in Detail - Patient Information: Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • hearing problems;
  • trouble with walking or daily activities;
  • numbness, tingling, or cold feeling in your hands or feet;
  • urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • drowsiness, mood changes, increased thirst, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting;
  • swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath;
  • easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin;
  • pale skin, feeling light-headed or short of breath, rapid heart rate, trouble concentrating;
  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, sores in your mouth and throat;
  • severe or ongoing vomiting;
  • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
  • sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;
  • sudden severe headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;
  • numbness or tingly feeling around your mouth, fast or slow heart rate, muscle tightness or contraction, overactive reflexes;
  • seizure (convulsions);
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • low magnesium (confusion, uneven heart rate, jerking muscle movements, muscle weakness or limp feeling);
  • low potassium (confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling); or
  • low sodium (headache, trouble concentrating, memory problems, feeling unsteady, hallucinations, fainting, shallow breathing or breathing that stops).

Less serious side effects may include:

  • decreased sense of taste;
  • mild nausea or vomiting;
  • tired feeling;
  • temporary hair loss; or
  • pain, swelling, burning, or irritation around the IV needle.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Platinol-AQ (Cisplatin Injection) »

What is Patient Information Overview?

A concise overview of the drug for the patient or caregiver from First DataBank.

Platinol-AQ Overview - Patient Information: Side Effects

SIDE EFFECTS: See also Warnings.

Nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea, and loss of taste may occur. Nausea and vomiting can be quite severe and persistent. Drug therapy is used to prevent or relieve nausea and vomiting. Not eating before your treatment may help relieve vomiting. Changes in diet such as eating several small meals or limiting activity may help lessen some of these effects. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Temporary hair loss may occur. Normal hair growth should return after treatment has ended.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: pain/burning/redness at the injection site, numbness/tingling/coldness/blue discoloration of the hands or feet, loss of reflexes, loss of balance, trouble walking, muscle cramps/spasms/weakness, neck or back pain, mouth or tongue sores, joint pain, swollen legs or feet, mental/mood changes, headache, fast/irregular heartbeat, blood in urine, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, black or bloody stools, painful or difficult urination, lower back or side pain, vision changes (e.g., blurred vision, seeing colors differently).

Rarely, temporary vision loss may occur with cisplatin use. Normal vision usually returns after the end of treatment. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details and report this side effect immediately if it occurs.

Get medical help right away if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: chest pain, jaw or left arm pain, confusion, slurred speech, weakness on one side of the body, seizures.

This medication can lower your body's ability to fight an infection. Notify your doctor promptly if you develop any signs of an infection such as fever, chills, persistent sore throat, or cough.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but get medical help right away if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Read the entire patient information overview for Platinol-AQ (Cisplatin Injection)»

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Platinol-AQ FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

Nephrotoxicity

Dose-related and cumulative renal insufficiency, including acute renal failure, is the major dose-limiting toxicity of PLATINOL-AQ. Renal toxicity has been noted in 28% to 36% of patients treated with a single dose of 50 mg/m2. It is first noted during the second week after a dose and is manifested by elevations in BUN and creatinine, serum uric acid and/or a decrease in creatinine clearance. Renal toxicity becomes more prolonged and severe with repeated courses of the drug. Renal function must return to normal before another dose of PLATINOL-AQ can be given. Elderly patients may be more susceptible to nephrotoxicity (see PRECAUTIONS: Geriatric Use).

Impairment of renal function has been associated with renal tubular damage. The administration of PLATINOL-AQ using a 6- to 8-hour infusion with intravenous hydration, and mannitol has been used to reduce nephrotoxicity. However, renal toxicity still can occur after utilization of these procedures.

Ototoxicity

Ototoxicity has been observed in up to 31% of patients treated with a single dose of PLATINOL-AQ 50 mg/m2, and is manifested by tinnitus and/or hearing loss in the high frequency range (4000 to 8000 Hz). The prevelance of hearing loss in children is particularly high and is estimated to be 40-60%. Decreased ability to hear normal conversational tones may occur. Deafness after the initial dose of PLATINOL-AQ has been reported. Ototoxic effects may be more severe in children receiving PLATINOLAQ.

Hearing loss can be unilateral or bilateral and tends to become more frequent and severe with repeated cisplatin doses. It is unclear whether PLATINOL-AQ-induced ototoxicity is reversible. Vestibular toxicity has also been reported. Ototoxic effects may be related to the peak plasma concentration of cisplatin. Ototoxicity can occur during treatment or be delayed. Audiometric monitoring should be performed prior to initiation of therapy, prior to each subsequent dose, and for several years post therapy.

The risk of ototoxicity may increased by prior or simultaneous cranial irradiation, and may be more severe in patients less than 5 years of age, patients being treated with other ototoxic drugs (e.g. aminoglycosides and vancomycin), and in patients with renal impairment. Variants in the thiopurine S-methyltransferase gene (TPMT) have been reported to be associated with an increased risk of ototoxicity in children treated with cisplatin (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY).

Other genetic factors may also contribute to the cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

Hematologic

Myelosuppression occurs in 25% to 30% of patients treated with PLATINOL-AQ. The nadirs in circulating platelets and leukocytes occur between days 18 to 23 (range 7.5 to 45) with most patients recovering by day 39 (range 13 to 62). Leukopenia and thrombocytopenia are more pronounced at higher doses ( > 50 mg/m2). Anemia (decrease of 2 g hemoglobin/100 mL) occurs at approximately the same frequency and with the same timing as leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. Fever and infection have also been reported in patients with neutropenia. Potential fatalities due to infection (secondary to myelosuppression) have been reported. Elderly patients may be more susceptible to myelosuppression (see PRECAUTIONS: Geriatric Use).

In addition to anemia secondary to myelosuppression, a Coombs' positive hemolytic anemia has been reported. In the presence of cisplatin hemolytic anemia, a further course of treatment may be accompanied by increased hemolysis and this risk should be weighed by the treating physician.

The development of acute leukemia coincident with the use of PLATINOL-AQ has been reported. In these reports, PLATINOL-AQ was generally given in combination with other leukemogenic agents.

Gastrointestinal

Marked nausea and vomiting occur in almost all patients treated with PLATINOL-AQ, and may be so severe that the drug must be discontinued. Nausea and vomiting may begin within 1 to 4 hours after treatment and last up to 24 hours. Various degrees of vomiting, nausea and/or anorexia may persist for up to 1 week after treatment.

Delayed nausea and vomiting (begins or persists 24 hours or more after chemotherapy) has occurred in patients attaining complete emetic control on the day of PLATINOL-AQ therapy.

Diarrhea has also been reported.

Other Toxicities

Vascular toxicities coincident with the use of PLATINOL-AQ in combination with other antineoplastic agents have been reported. The events are clinically heterogeneous and may include myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, thrombotic microangiopathy (hemolytic-uremic syndrome [HUS]), or cerebral arteritis. Various mechanisms have been proposed for these vascular complications. There are also reports of Raynaud's phenomenon occurring in patients treated with the combination of bleomycin, vinblastine with or without PLATINOL-AQ. It has been suggested that hypomagnesemia developing coincident with the use of PLATINOL-AQ may be an added, although not essential, factor associated with this event. However, it is currently unknown if the cause of Raynaud's phenomenon in these cases is the disease, underlying vascular compromise, bleomycin, vinblastine, hypomagnesemia, or a combination of any of these factors.

Serum Electrolyte Disturbances

Hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and hypophosphatemia have been reported to occur in patients treated with PLATINOL-AQ and are probably related to renal tubular damage. Tetany has been reported in those patients with hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia. Generally, normal serum electrolyte levels are restored by administering supplemental electrolytes and discontinuing PLATINOL-AQ.

Inappropriate antidiuretic hormone syndrome has also been reported.

Hyperuricemia

Hyperuricemia has been reported to occur at approximately the same frequency as the increases in BUN and serum creatinine.

It is more pronounced after doses greater than 50 mg/m2, and peak levels of uric acid generally occur between 3 to 5 days after the dose. Allopurinol therapy for hyperuricemia effectively reduces uric acid levels.

Neurotoxicity

See WARNINGS.

Neurotoxicity, usually characterized by peripheral neuropathies, has been reported. The neuropathies usually occur after prolonged therapy (4 to 7 months); however, neurologic symptoms have been reported to occur after a single dose. Although symptoms and signs of PLATINOL-AQ neuropathy usually develop during treatment, symptoms of neuropathy may begin 3 to 8 weeks after the last dose of PLATINOL-AQ. PLATINOL-AQ therapy should be discontinued when the symptoms are first observed. The neuropathy, however, may progress further even after stopping treatment. Preliminary evidence suggests peripheral neuropathy may be irreversible in some patients. Elderly patients may be more susceptible to peripheral neuropathy (see PRECAUTIONS: Geriatric Use).

Lhermitte's sign, dorsal column myelopathy, and autonomic neuropathy have also been reported.

Loss of taste, seizures, leukoencephalopathy, and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) have also been reported.

Muscle cramps, defined as localized, painful, involuntary skeletal muscle contractions of sudden onset and short duration, have been reported and were usually associated in patients receiving a relatively high cumulative dose of PLATINOL-AQ and with a relatively advanced symptomatic stage of peripheral neuropathy.

Ocular Toxicity

Optic neuritis, papilledema, and cerebral blindness have been reported in patients receiving standard recommended doses of PLATINOL-AQ. Improvement and/or total recovery usually occurs after discontinuing PLATINOL-AQ. Steroids with or without mannitol have been used; however, efficacy has not been established.

Blurred vision and altered color perception have been reported after the use of regimens with higher doses of PLATINOL-AQ or greater dose frequencies than recommended in the package insert. The altered color perception manifests as a loss of color discrimination, particularly in the blue-yellow axis. The only finding on funduscopic exam is irregular retinal pigmentation of the macular area.

Anaphylactic-Like Reactions

Anaphylactic-like reactions have been reported in patients previously exposed to PLATINOL-AQ. The reactions consist of facial edema, wheezing, tachycardia, and hypotension within a few minutes of drug administration. Reactions may be controlled by intravenous epinephrine with corticosteroids and/or antihistamines as indicated. Patients receiving PLATINOL-AQ should be observed carefully for possible anaphylactic-like reactions and supportive equipment and medication should be available to treat such a complication.

Hepatotoxicity

Transient elevations of liver enzymes, especially SGOT, as well as bilirubin, have been reported to be associated with PLATINOL-AQ administration at the recommended doses.

Other Events

Cardiac abnormalities, hiccups, elevated serum amylase, rash, alopecia, malaise, asthenia, and dehydration have been reported.

Local soft tissue toxicity has been reported following extravasation of PLATINOL-AQ. Severity of the local tissue toxicity appears to be related to the concentration of the PLATINOL-AQ solution. Infusion of solutions with a PLATINOL-AQ concentration greater than 0.5 mg/mL may result in tissue cellulitis, fibrosis, necrosis, pain, edema, and erythema.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Platinol-AQ (Cisplatin Injection) »

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Platinol-AQ - User Reviews

Platinol-AQ User Reviews

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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