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Priftin

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Priftin

Disclaimer

Priftin Consumer

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

RIFAPENTINE - ORAL

(riff-uh-PEN-teen)

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Priftin

USES: This medication is used with other medications to treat tuberculosis (TB) of the lungs. Rifapentine is known as a rifamycin antibiotic. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria.

This antibiotic treats only bacterial infections. It will not work for viral infections (such as common cold, flu). Unnecessary use or misuse of any antibiotic can lead to its decreased effectiveness.

HOW TO USE: Take this medication by mouth with food, usually once or twice weekly, or as directed by your doctor. Taking this medication with food will help to decrease side effects such as stomach upset, nausea, and vomiting and also increase the absorption of this medication.

The dosage is based on your weight, medical condition, and response to treatment.

Antibiotics work best when the amount of medicine in your body is kept at a constant level. Therefore, take this drug at evenly spaced intervals. To help you remember, take it on the same day(s) of the week and at the same time each day. Mark the days on the calendar when you need to take the medication.

Continue to take this medication (and other TB medications) until the full prescribed amount is finished, even if symptoms disappear. Stopping the medication too early or skipping doses may allow the bacteria to continue to grow, which may result in a return of the infection and cause the infection to be more difficult to treat (resistant).

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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