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Principen

Side Effects
Interactions

SIDE EFFECTS

As with other penicillins, it may be expected that untoward reactions will be essentially limited to sensitivity phenomena. They are more likely to occur in individuals who have previously demonstrated hypersensitivity to penicillin and in those with a history of allergy, asthma, hay fever, or urticaria.

The following adverse reactions have been reported as associated with the use of ampicillin:

Gastrointestinal: glositis, stamatitis, nausea, vomiting, enterocolitis, pseudomembranous colitis, and diarrhea. These reactions are usually associated with oral dosage forms of the drugs.

Hypersensitivity Reactions: An erythematous, mildly pruritic, maculopapular skin rash has been reported fairly frequently. The rash, which usually does not develop within the first week of therapy, may cover the entire body including the soles, palms, and oral mucosa. The eruption usually disappears in three to seven days.

Other hypersensitivity reactions that have been reported are: skin rash, pruritus, urticaria, erythema multiforme, and an occasional case of exfoliative dermatitis. Anaphylaxis is the most serious reaction experienced and has usually been associated with the parenteral dosage form of the drug

Note: Urticaria, other skin rashes, and serum sickness-like reactions may be controlled by antihistamines, and if necessary, systemic corticosteroids. Whenever such reactions occur, ampicillin should be discontinued unless, in the opinion of the physician, the condition being treated is life-threatening, and amenable only to ampicillin therapy. Serious anaphylactoid reactions require emergency measures (see WARNINGS).

Liver: Moderate elevation in serum glutamic oxalaacetic transaminase (SGOT) has been noted, but the significance of this finding is unknown.

Hemic and Lymphatic Systems: Anemia, thrombocytopenia, thrombocytopenic purpura, eosinophilia, leukapenia, and agranulacytosis have been reported during therapy with penicillins. These reactions are usually reversible on discontinuation of therapy and are believed to be hypersensitivity phenomena.

Other: Other adverse reactions that have been reported with the use at ampicillin are laryngeal stride and high fever. An occasional patient may complain of sore mouth or tongue as with any oral penicillin preparation.

Read the Principen (ampicillin) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

DRUG INTERACTIONS

When administered concurrently, the following drugs may interact with ampicillin.

Allopurinol: Increased possibility of skin rash, particularly in hyperuricemic patients may occur.

Bacteriostatic Antibiotics: Chloramphenicol, erythromycins, sulfonamides, or tetracyclines may interfere with the bactericidal effect of penicillins. This has been demonstrated in view, however, the clinical significance of this interaction is not well documented.

Oral Contraceptives: May be less effective and increased breakthrough bleeding may occur.

Probenecid: May decrease renal tubular secretion of ampicillin resulting in increased blood levels and/or ampicillin toxicity.

Drug/Laboratory Test Interaction

After treatment with ampicillin, a false-positive reaction for glucose in the urine may occur with copper sulfate tests (Benedict's solution, Fehling's solution, or Clinitest tablets) but not with enzyme based tests such as Clinistix and Glucose Enzymatic Test Strip USP.

Read the Principen Drug Interactions Center for a complete guide to possible interactions

Last reviewed on RxList: 1/29/2005
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Side Effects
Interactions
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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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