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"Sometimes the juice ain't worth the squeeze... especially when combining grapefruit with medicines.

While it can be part of a balanced and nutritious diet, grapefruit can have serious consequences when taken with certain medications. Cu"...

Prohibit

Prohibit Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (Prohibit)?

Anyone who had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of Hib should not get another dose.

Children younger than 6 weeks of age should not get Hib vaccine.

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. Those who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting Hib vaccine.

Talk to your doctor before receiving Hib vaccine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby.

How is haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine administered (Prohibit)?

Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will administer the haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine as an injection.

Children should get 4 doses of Hib vaccine, one dose at each of the following ages: 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and 12-15 months. Depending on what brand of Hib vaccine is used, your child might not need the dose at 6 months of age. Your doctor or nurse will tell you if this dose is needed.

Children over 5 years old usually do not need Hib vaccine. But some older children or adults with special health conditions should get it. These conditions include sickle cell disease, HIV/AIDS, removal of the spleen, bone marrow transplant, or cancer treatment with drugs. Ask your doctor or nurse for details.

Hib may be given at the same time as other vaccines.

Your doctor may recommend reducing fever and pain by giving the child an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, Tempra, others) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Your healthcare provider can tell you the appropriate dosages of these medications.

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