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Pulmonary Hypertension (Symptoms, Treatment Medications, and Life Expectancy)

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Pulmonary hypertension definition and facts

  • Pulmonary hypertension is abnormally elevated pressure in the pulmonary circulation.
  • The classification of primary and secondary pulmonary hypertension has been reclassified, and now is based on the main underlying disease or condition, symptoms, and treatment options for pulmonary hypertension. There are five classes or groups in this new classification system.
  • Pulmonary hypertension can have no identifiable cause and is then referred to as idiopathic pulmonary hypertension (formerly called primary pulmonary hypertension).
  • Pulmonary hypertension can be caused by certain drugs, diseases (scleroderma, dermatomyositis, systemic lupus), infections (HIV, schistosomiasis), liver disease, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease, chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), blood clots in the lungs, and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN).
  • Risk factors for pulmonary hypertension are liver failure, chronic lung disease, blood clotting disorders, and underlying diseases, such as scleroderma, dermatomyositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus.
  • Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension include
    • shortness of breath,
    • difficulty breathing with exertion,
    • dizziness,
    • rapid breathing, and
    • rapid heart rate.
  • Pulmonary hypertension is diagnosed by measuring the pulmonary pressures by either ultrasound of the heart (echocardiogram) or right heart catheterization.
  • The treatment for pulmonary hypertension can include oxygen, diuretics, blood thinners, medications that open the pulmonary arteries, and treatments for any underlying disease.
  • The prognosis and life expectancy for a person with pulmonary hypertension is improving as newer treatment options become available; however, prognosis may depend on the underlying disease or condition that is causing pulmonary hypertension.

What is pulmonary hypertension?

Pulmonary hypertension occurs when the pressure in the pulmonary arteries increases abnormally. To help explain this condition further, here is how the pulmonary arteries work.

What are pulmonary arteries?

The human body has two major sets of blood vessels that distribute blood from the heart to the body. One set pumps blood from the right heart to the lungs, and the other from the left heart to the rest of the body (systemic circulation). When a doctor or a nurse measures the blood pressure on a person's arm, he/she is measuring the pressures in the systemic circulation. When these pressures are abnormally high, the person is diagnosed as having high blood pressure (systemic hypertension).

The portion of the circulation that distributes the blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs and back to the left side of the heart is referred to as the pulmonary (lung) circulation.

The right ventricle pumps blood returning from the body into the pulmonary arteries to the lungs to receive oxygen. The pressures in the lung arteries (pulmonary arteries) are normally significantly lower than the pressures in the systemic circulation. When pressure in the pulmonary circulation becomes abnormally elevated, it is referred to as pulmonary hypertension. This most commonly occurs when the pulmonary venous pressure is elevated, so called pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH). This pressure is transmitted back to the right side of the heart and the pulmonary arteries. The result is elevated pulmonary pressure throughout the pulmonary circulation. Some of this is a direct pressure transmission from the venous system backward and some can result from a reactive constriction of the pulmonary arteries.

Less commonly, pulmonary hypertension results from constriction, or stiffening, of the pulmonary arteries that supply blood to the lungs, so called pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).

Whether it is pulmonary venous or pulmonary arterial hypertension, it becomes more difficult for the heart to pump blood forward through the lungs. This stress on the heart leads to enlargement of the right heart and eventually fluid can build up in the liver and other tissues, such as the in the legs.

What are normal pulmonary artery pressure ranges?

When the heart pumps blood it is referred to as systole, and when the heart fills with blood it is referred to as diastole. Normal pulmonary artery pressures range from an upper pressure (systolic) of 15-30 mmHg and a lower pressure (diastolic) of 4-12 mmHg. These values can be obtained approximately by and ultrasound of the heart (echocardiogram), and more accurately using a catheter to measure the pressures in the pulmonary circulation (right heart catheterization).

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/26/2017

Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/pulmonary_hypertension/article.htm

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