Pyridium

Warnings
Precautions

WARNINGS

No information provided.

PRECAUTIONS

General: A yellowish tinge of the skin or sclera may indicate accumulation due to impaired renal excretion and the need to discontinue therapy.

The decline in renal function associated with advanced age should be kept in mind.

Laboratory Test Interactions: Due to its properties as an azo dye, Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride may interfere with urinalysis based on spectrometry or color reactions.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility: Long-term administration of Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride has induced neoplasia in rats (large intestine) and mice (liver). Although no association between Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride and human neoplasia has been reported, adequate epidemiological studies along these lines have not been conducted.

Pregnancy Category B: Reproduction studies have been performed in rats at doses up to 50 mg/kg/day and have revealed no evidence of impaired fertility or harm to the fetus due to Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride. There are however, no adequate and well controlled studies in pregnant women. Because animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, this drug should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed.

Nursing Mothers: No information is available on the appearance of Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride or its metabolites in human milk.

Last reviewed on RxList: 8/22/2007
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Warnings
Precautions
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