November 27, 2015
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Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

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What is Ramsay Hunt syndrome? What causes it?

Ramsay Hunt syndrome (also termed Hunt's Syndrome and herpes zoster oticus) is a herpes zoster virus infection of the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. It is caused by reactivation of herpes zoster virus that has previously caused chickenpox in the patient. Ramsay Hunt syndrome results in paralysis of the facial muscles on the same side of the face as the infection. So, the virus infects the facial nerve that normally controls the muscles on one side of the face. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is typically associated with a red rash and blisters (inflamed vesicles or tiny water-filled sacks in the skin) in or around the ear and eardrum and sometimes on the roof of the mouth or tongue.

What are the symptoms of Ramsay Hunt syndrome?

The classic symptom that clinically distinguishes Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a red painful rash associated with blisters in the ears and facial paralysis (for example, eyelid or mouth) on one side of the face. Other symptoms such as ear pain, hearing loss, dizziness (or vertigo), dry eye, and changes in taste sensation may also occur.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/4/2015


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